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This question already has an answer here:

In one of my classes, a method performs AJAX requests. In the callback function of a request, I need to call another method of my object, using this. But this does not refer to my object in this context, so I don't know how to do... Is it only possible ?

To clarify, please consider the following code :

function MyClass(arg) { 
    this.foo = arg; 
} 

MyClass.prototype = { 
    myMethod: function() { 
        console.log("I am myMethod");
    },
    myGet: function (){
        $.get("http://example.iana.org/",function(data){
            this.myMethod(); // does not work, because 'this' does not refer to my object
        });
    }
} 

var obj = new MyClass("Javascript is complicated"); 

obj.myGet();
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Bergi javascript Dec 1 '14 at 16:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can define a variable to store this in the closure :

myGet: function (){
    var _this = this;
    $.get("http://example.iana.org/",function(data){
        _this.myMethod();
    });
}

or use $.proxy :

myGet: function (){
    $.get("http://example.iana.org/", $.proxy(function(data){
        this.myMethod();
    }, this));
}

or, if you don't do more than calling myMethod in the callback :

myGet: function (){
    $.get("http://example.iana.org/", $.proxy(this.myMethod, this));
}

In modern browsers you can also use bind. When I don't have to be compatible with IE8 I do

myGet: function (){
    $.get("http://example.iana.org/", this.myMethod.bind(this));
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 $.proxy is cooler – techfoobar Jun 10 '13 at 9:03
2  
@emmasculateur Personally I have no problem with the additional variable, especially when you give it a less generic name, but $.proxy might make the intent clearer. – Denys Séguret Jun 10 '13 at 9:06
1  
Sometimes using the additional variable is not possible. For instance if you're many levels deep into callbacks when writing asynchronous code, you can lose your reference to the original this. In such an instance $.proxy can come to the rescue. – Matt Harrison Jun 10 '13 at 9:13
2  
@MattHarrison Not quite sure on that - it should work fine as long as you create a closure to store the current this reference, seeing as that is basically what $.proxy does internally. – Fabrício Matté Jun 11 '13 at 6:43
1  
@MattHarrison "better" is relative - bind and $.proxy are the shorter and most syntactically sweet syntax. I just meant that where these are used, you may also wrap yet another function around it storing the this reference that you can then use to call/apply the inner function. – Fabrício Matté Jun 11 '13 at 8:33

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