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I'm pretty new to writing OO JS, but this has stumped me. So I setup me new Call object, then define what I assume to be empty arrays. When I call AddFieldQueryToArray() I get

Uncaught TypeError: Cannot call method 'push' of undefined 

On this.fieldArray.push(field)

I don't really know why. I've tried this.fieldArray = fieldArray; in the constructor too.

    function Call() 
    {    
         var fieldArray = new Array();
         var queryArray = new Array();
    }

    Call.prototype.AddFieldQuerysToArray = function(field,query)
    {
        if(field !== 'undefined')
        {               
            this.fieldArray.push(field);
        }

        this.queryArray.push(query);

    }
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Just one comment, in JavaScript pls always put opening braces on the same line of the statement: i.e. function call() {, if (field !== 'undefined') {. This has side effects in some cases such as with return and a proper JS code should keep this form. –  Arman McHitaryan Jun 10 '13 at 10:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You should reference instance properties with this. inside the constructor:

function Call() 
{    
     this.fieldArray = [];
     this.queryArray = [];
}

new Array() has a shortcut [] which I have used above.

If you use var fieldArray = []; you would create a local variable which is destroyed once your instance has been created unless you use this kind of construct:

function Call()
{
    var fieldArray = [];

    this.AddFieldQuerysToArray = function(field, query) {
        // ...
        fieldArray.push(field);
    }
}

This creates a closure for each instance in which fieldArray is "kept alive" throughout the instance's lifetime.

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"destroyed once your instance has been created" -- unless it's referenced from a closure –  Jan Dvorak Jun 10 '13 at 9:17
    
@JanDvorak The given code didn't give that suggestion, but I've added an example of such a condition. –  Ja͢ck Jun 10 '13 at 9:22
    
I always find adding methods to this inside a constructor looks ugly, with the exception of something like function Constr() {var env = {}; this.getEnv = function (x) {if (x) return env[x];return env;};} –  Paul S. Jun 10 '13 at 9:26
    
@PaulS. It's also good for information hiding :) –  Ja͢ck Jun 10 '13 at 9:29
1  
@Jack if it's on the client side, it's visible. Also a local variable which is destroyed once your instance has been created, if only - function Constr() { var secret = 'I am IRON MAN'; this.find = function (x) { return eval(x); }; } c = new Constr(); c.find('secret'); // "I am IRON MAN" –  Paul S. Jun 10 '13 at 9:36
<script>
function Call() 
{
    this.fieldArray = [];
    this.queryArray = [];       
}


Call.prototype.AddFieldQuerysToArray = function(field,query)
{
    if(field !== 'undefined')
    {
        alert('field==='+this.fieldArray);
        this.fieldArray.push(field);
    }
    alert('field==='+this.fieldArray);  
    this.queryArray.push(query);
alert(this.queryArray);// to check
alert(this.fieldArray);// to check
};

field = 'exampleField';
query = 'exampleField';

var cally = new Call();
cally.AddFieldQuerysToArray(field,query); //change

</script>

Buddy the only problem is that u were calling Call.prototype.AddFieldQuerysToArray() method and here this value actually referred to execution context of Call.prototype object which didn't has the arrays fieldArray and queryArray

Calling prototype method AddFieldQuerysToArray() by coding cally.AddFieldQuerysToArray(field,query); .here this refers to execution context of cally instance which has got both the arrays declared in it by constructor pattern

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alert(Object.getOwnPropertyNames(Call.prototype)); This simple code will help you understand that fieldArray and queryArray arrays aren't actually present in execution context of Call.prototype –  chetan mehta Jun 10 '13 at 9:55

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