Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
I tried to overload the operator !=

    struct Antichoc 
    { 
        quint8 Chariot; 
        quint8 Frittage;

    bool operator!=(const Antichoc &a, const Antichoc &b) 
    { 
        return a.Chariot != b.Chariot || a.Frittage != b.Frittage; 
    }
    }

I get the error :

bool Antichoc::operator!=(const Antichoc&, const Antichoc&) must take exactly one argument

Why this error

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Non-static member functions take an implicit, hidden first parameter with a pointer to the same type. So your member operator actually has three parameters, where it should have two.

You could either make it a non-member operator:

struct Antichoc { .... };

bool operator!=(const Antichoc &a, const Antichoc &b) 
{ 
    return a.Chariot != b.Chariot || a.Frittage != b.Frittage; 
}

Or make it a member taking only one argument.

struct Antichoc 
{ 
    quint8 Chariot; 
    quint8 Frittage;

  bool operator!=(const Antichoc& rhs) const 
  { 
    return Chariot != rhs.Chariot || Frittage != rhs.Frittage; 
  }
};

The first version would allow for implicit conversions to Antichoc, which is not necessary in this particular example.

Usually it is good practice to implement != in terms of ==.

Note that in C++11 you can simplify all of these logical operators by using std::tie:

#include <tuple>

bool operator!=(const Antichoc &a, const Antichoc &b) 
{ 
    return std::tie(a.Chariot, a.Frittage) != std::tie(b.Chariot, b.Frittage); 
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.