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I'm simply trying to delete all the whitespace from a string using C++11's range-based for loop; however, I keep getting std::out_of_range on basic_string::erase.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <typeinfo>

int main(){

  std::string str{"hello my name is sam"};

  //compiles, but throws an out_of_range exception
  for(auto i : str){
    std::cout << typeid(i).name();  //gcc outputs 'c' for 'char'
    if(isspace(i)){
      str.erase(i);
    }
  }
  std::cout << std::endl;

  //does not compile - "invalid type argument of unary '*' (have 'char')"
  for(auto i : str){
    if(isspace(*i)){
      str.erase(i);
    }
  }

  //works exactly as expected
  for(std::string::iterator i = begin(str); i != end(str); ++i){
    std::cout << typeid(*i).name();  //gcc outputs 'c' for 'char'
    if(isspace(*i)){
      str.erase(i);
    }
  }
  std::cout << std::endl;

}

So I'm wondering: what exactly is i in the first two loops? Why is it seemingly both a char (as verified by typeid) and an iterator to a char (works with std::string::erase)? Why isn't it equivalent to the iterator in the last loop? It seems to me that they should function exactly the same.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The type of i in the range-based for loop is char, since the elements of a string are characters (more formally, std::string::value_type is an alias for char).

The reason why it seems to work as an iterator when you pass it to erase() is that an overload of erase() exists that accepts an index and a count, but the latter has a default argument:

basic_string& erase( size_type index = 0, size_type count = npos );

And on your implementation char happens to be implicitly convertible to std::string::size_type. However, this is likely not doing what you expect.

To verify that i is not indeed an iterator, try dereferencing it and you will see the compiler screaming:

*i; // This will cause an error
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2  
I think it's worth noting that the for-loop given at the end may not work correctly, because erase can invalidate the loop iterator. To fix this, you can use the iterator that erase returns, although if used naively this may lead to poor performance (the loop will be worst-case quadratic instead of linear time, because erase is itself worse-case linear). For efficiency you should use std::remove or std::remove_if, or a similar implementation, as suggested in @syam's answer (edit: which has since been deleted). –  John Bartholomew Jun 10 '13 at 10:51
    
@JohnBartholomew: Good point. My answer mostly focused on the first questions in the last paragraph, I did not delve into a deeper analysis :) Thank you for your pointing out –  Andy Prowl Jun 10 '13 at 12:03

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