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I have the following data:

>Data
#  X        Y
#  1   123 234 345 456 
#  2   222 333 444 555 666

and I want the following result:

>Data
#  X     Y
#  1    123 
#  1    234 
#  1    345 
#  1    456 
#  2    222 
#  2    333 
#  2    444
#  2    555 
#  2    666

Please help!

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3  
could you post dput of your Data? It's hard to see if column Y is a string/character vector or a list. –  Arun Jun 10 '13 at 12:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If your column Y is a character vector, then this should do:

out <- stack(setNames(strsplit(df$Y, " "), df$X))
out$values <- as.numeric(out$values)

Benchmarking all answers on a 20e4 row data.frame:

Creating data:

df <- read.table(header=TRUE, text="X        Y
    1   '123 234 345 456'
    2   '222 333 444 555 666'")
# thanks to @MatthewPlourde for the suggestion to use replicate
df <- do.call(rbind, replicate(10000, df, simplify = FALSE))

dim(df)
# [1] 20000     2

sapply(df, class)
        X         Y 
"integer"  "factor" 

Functions:

# Arun's function
Arun <- function(df) {
    out <- stack(setNames(strsplit(as.character(df$Y), " "), df$X))
    out$values <- as.numeric(out$values)
    out
}

# Ananda's function
Ananda <- function(Data) {
    Data1 <- cbind(X = Data$X, 
           read.table(text = as.character(Data$Y), 
                      fill = TRUE, header = FALSE))
    data.frame(X = Data1[, 1], stack(Data1[-1]))
}

# Matthew's solution
Matthew <- function(d) {
    stack(by(d$Y, d$X, function(x) 
            as.numeric(scan(text=as.character(x), 
            what='', quiet=TRUE))))
}

Benchmarking:

require(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(a1 <- Arun(df), a2 <- Ananda(df), a3 <- Matthew(df), times = 5)
Unit: milliseconds
              expr       min        lq    median        uq       max neval
    a1 <- Arun(df)  235.6945  258.8485  264.4166  329.2974  392.9559     5
  a2 <- Ananda(df) 6661.8461 6972.2823 7825.3701 8210.9970 9454.5762     5
 a3 <- Matthew(df) 3589.1784 3691.3826 3787.4163 4020.4895 5034.6580     5
share|improve this answer
    
Y is not character, but factor –  Dryad Jun 10 '13 at 12:51
    
replace df$Y with as.character(df$Y) –  Arun Jun 10 '13 at 12:53
    
+1 Thanks for the benchmark. Interesting to see that strsplit is faster. However, OP indicated the column was factor, not character, and if you modify your function to take this into account, the difference is less dramatic. –  Matthew Plourde Jun 10 '13 at 14:13
1  
Not to nitpick, but df <- do.call(rbind, replicate(10000, df)) might be a nicer way to generate the big data.frame. –  Matthew Plourde Jun 10 '13 at 14:26
1  
@Arun oops, replicate needs simplify=FALSE. –  Matthew Plourde Jun 10 '13 at 14:41

This really doesn't build very much on your earlier question. Please try to do some homework on your own, or at least show what you've tried so far!

Data1 <- cbind(X = Data$X, 
               read.table(text = as.character(Data$Y), 
                          fill = TRUE, header = FALSE))
data.frame(X = Data1[, 1], stack(Data1[-1]))
#    X values ind
# 1  1    123  V1
# 2  2    222  V1
# 3  1    234  V2
# 4  2    333  V2
# 5  1    345  V3
# 6  2    444  V3
# 7  1    456  V4
# 8  2    555  V4
# 9  1     NA  V5
# 10 2    666  V5
share|improve this answer
    
@Ananada Mahto, I try your method in my actual data, but show error Error in data.frame(..., check.names = FALSE) : arguments imply differing number of rows: 1496, 1502 Can you see what happens. I know I have a lot of similar questions because I newer to R. Thank you! –  Dryad Jun 10 '13 at 12:43

There are already good answers here, but this is another way with by and scan.

stack(by(d$Y, d$X, 
         function(x) as.numeric(scan(text=as.character(x), what='', quiet=TRUE))))
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you!It works –  Dryad Jun 10 '13 at 13:02
2  
@Dryad, now, the trick is to try to figure out why.... –  Ananda Mahto Jun 10 '13 at 13:02
    
This is about 10 times slower than using strsplit on a 20e4*2 data.frame. –  Arun Jun 10 '13 at 13:55

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