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Why does this code give me a linker error and how do I fix it?

Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64: "operator==(foo const&, foo const&)", referenced from: _main in main.o ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64

template<typename T>
class foo {
  //friends get access to the private member t
  friend bool operator==(const foo<T> &lhs, const foo<T> &rhs);
  T t;
};

template<typename T>
bool operator==(const foo<T> &lhs, const foo<T> &rhs) {
  return lhs.t == rhs.t;
}

int main(int,char**) {
  foo<int> f1, f2;
  if (f1 == f2)
    ;
  return 0;
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a fix of your code:

template<typename T>
class foo; // Forward declaration

template<typename T> // Need to define or declare this before the class
bool operator==(const foo<T> &lhs, const foo<T> &rhs) {
  return lhs.t == rhs.t; 
}

template<typename T>
class foo {
  // Notice the little <> here denoting a specialization
  friend bool operator==<>(const foo<T> &lhs, const foo<T> &rhs);
  T t;
};
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Declaring the function first would suffice. –  Sebastian Redl Jun 10 '13 at 12:32
    
@SebastianRedl: foo is unknown before the class definition, you need the forward declaration or define within or after the class. –  Jesse Good Jun 10 '13 at 12:35
    
@JesseGood: I think Sebastian meant that it suffices to forward-declare operator==. Since it compiles either way, it's an open question whether that's necessary. +1, anyway. Nice answer. –  Marcelo Cantos Jun 10 '13 at 12:36
    
I meant that you could declare the operator == template before the class template definition, then define the operator == template afterwards. Because I prefer the class definition appearing before any function that uses it, I would prefer doing it this way. I was not suggesting that you can omit the class template declaration. –  Sebastian Redl Jun 10 '13 at 12:37
    
@SebastianRedl: Ah I see now. I edited it to be define or declare. Thanks. –  Jesse Good Jun 10 '13 at 12:38

operator== is a function template, but the friendship declaration doesn't reflect this. This is one way to fix it:

template <class U>
friend bool operator==(const foo<U> &lhs, const foo<U> &rhs);

One very minor glitch is that it gives operator==<int> friend-access to foo<string>. For this reason, I think @JesseGood's fix is cleaner, albeit (paradoxically) more verbose.

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You need to specify the template types again, but different to the class template type:

template<typename V>
friend bool operator==(const foo<V> &lhs, const foo<V> &rhs);
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When overloading operators, avoid using friend functions; you'll want to define your function as a public class member, and make it take only one argument (not two).

template<typename T>
class foo {
  //public function allowing access to the private member t
  public:
  bool operator==(  foo<T> &rhs)
  {
      return t == rhs.t;
  }
  private:
  T t;
};


int main(int,char**) {
  foo<int> f1, f2;
  if (f1 == f2)
    ;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, generally speaking you don't, because that introduces an asymmetry between the automatic conversions done for the left and right side. –  Sebastian Redl Jun 10 '13 at 12:31

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