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Is there a version from the method force_encoding that don't modify the caller object?

So, the current force_encoding works like this:

> a
 => "Ü" 
> a.force_encoding("BINARY")
 => "\xC3\x9C" 
> a
 => "\xC3\x9C" 

I would like the result to be like this:

> a
 => "Ü" 
> a.force_encoding_non_destructive("BINARY")
 => "\xC3\x9C" 
> a
 => "Ü" 

Note that I fully understand that a.force_encoding("UTF-16LE").force_encoding("UTF-8") yelds the same result (assuming that a was previously UTF-8, of course) and the bytes in string is not modified. However, the string state is modified, and thus this method is destructive. for example:

a="a"
a.freeze
a.force_encoding("BINARY")
# raises error
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try the above stackoverflow.com/questions/10200544/… –  kostas ch. Jun 10 '13 at 12:50
    
I think you're misunderstanding what force_encoding actually does in your example. It's not modifying your string's content in any way. Rather, it is changing a property of the string -- the one which controls how it is presented to you. –  Denis Jun 10 '13 at 12:51
    
@Denis I belive you are wrong. Try this in your console: a = "a" ; b = "b" ; a + b. Afterwards, try this: a = "a" ; b = "b" ; a + b ; a.force_encoding("UTF-16LE"); a + b. If the same statement generates different output after calling a method in one of the objects implicates in that method modified the object state. –  fotanus Jun 10 '13 at 12:55
    
Hold. Changing to UTF-16LT is not the same as changing to binary (which you used in your example). :-) Binary is just that... a stream of bytes. UTF-8 and UTF-16 encode the same character differently, and modify the string accordingly (when possible). In contrast and to the best of my knowledge, forcing a string to binary yields the exact same string. –  Denis Jun 10 '13 at 12:58
1  
Yes, the object's encoding property has changed. But not the string itself, when you switch to an encoding to binary and back. –  Denis Jun 10 '13 at 13:12
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

force_encoding is non-destructive in terms of not changing the receiver's bytes. It just changes how the bytes are interpreted, i.e. it changes the string's characters:

a = "Ü"
a.bytes.to_a               #=> [195, 156]
a.chars.to_a               #=> ["Ü"]

a.force_encoding("BINARY")
a.bytes.to_a               #=> [195, 156]
a.chars.to_a               #=> ["\xC3", "\x9C"]

The encoding is stored within the string instance. To get a copy in "binary" encoding use:

a.dup.force_encoding("BINARY")
share|improve this answer
    
So how do explain this: a="a"; a.freeze; a.force_encoding("BINARY")? I'll edit my question to cover this too, since you are not the first telling this. –  fotanus Jun 10 '13 at 13:04
    
I said "not changing the receiver's bytes". The string's encoding does change. I've updated my answer. –  Stefan Jun 10 '13 at 13:13
    
a="Ü"; b="Ü"; a.force_encoding("BINARY"); a.bytes.to_a == b.bytes.to_a => true –  ajt Jun 10 '13 at 13:16
    
Read my comment in the answer above - I suggest you to add a simple method implementation using dup... since that is what the question asks :-) –  fotanus Jun 10 '13 at 13:18
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I deeply apologize for another short answer. Obviously, #force_encoding modifies the string attribute, but I would not go so far as calling it destructive. You can always reverse the change. If you want to have your cake, and eat it, #dup it.

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1  
Actually this time the answer have more content than already told in the comments or in a simple googling, because this works: a.freeze.dup.force_encoding("BINARY"), so an object loses the freeze when duplicated. If there is no standard method to do this, so maybe the best way is to dup it. –  fotanus Jun 10 '13 at 13:18
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