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Some of you might have seen Beyond "Soda, Pop, or Coke". I am facing a similar problem and would like to create a plot like that. In my case, I have a very large number of geo-coded observations (over 1 million) and a binary attribute x. I would like to show the distribution of x on a map with a color scale ranging from 0 to 1 for p(x=1).

I am open to other approaches but Katz's approach for Beyond "Soda, Pop, or Coke" is described here and uses these packages: fields, maps, mapproj, plyr, RANN, RColorBrewer, scales, and zipcode. His approach relies on k-nearest neighbor kernal smoothing with Gaussian kernel. He first defines a distance for each location t on the map to all observations and then uses a distance-weighted estimate for p(x=1|t) (probability that x is 1 conditional on the location). The formula is here.

When I understand this correctly, creating such a map in R involves these steps:

  1. Build grid that covers the entire region of the shapefile (let's call the points in the grid t). I tried this approach using polygrid but failed so far. Code is below.
  2. For each t, calculate the distance to all the observations (or just find the k clostest points and calculate the distance for this subset)
  3. calculate p(x=1|t) according to the formula defined here
  4. plot all t with an appropriate colorscale that ranges from 0 to 1

Here is some example data and I two concrete questions. First, how do solve my problem with step 1? As the second map below shows, my current approach fails. That is a clear R implementation question and once that is solved, I should be able to complete the other steps. Second and more broadly, is that the right approach or would you suggest a different way to create heatmap with distribution of attribute values?

load libraries and open shapefile and packages

# set path
path = PATH   # CHANGE THIS!!
# load libraries
library("stringr")
library("rgdal")
library("maptools")
library("maps")
library("RANN")
library("fields")
library("plyr")
library("geoR")
library("ggplot2")

# open shapefile
map.proj          = CRS(" +proj=lcc +lat_1=40.66666666666666 +lat_2=41.03333333333333 +lat_0=40.16666666666666 +lon_0=-74 +x_0=300000 +y_0=0 +datum=NAD83 +units=us-ft +no_defs +ellps=GRS80 +towgs84=0,0,0")
proj4.longlat=CRS("+proj=longlat +ellps=GRS80")
shape = readShapeSpatial(str_c(path,"test-shape"),proj4string=map.proj)
shape = spTransform(shape, proj4.longlat)
# open data
df=readRDS(str_c(path,"df.rds"))

plot data

# plot shapefile with points
par (mfrow=c(1,1),mar=c(0,0,0,0), cex=0.8, cex.lab=0.8, cex.main=0.8, mgp=c(1.2,0.15,0), cex.axis=0.7, tck=-0.02,bg = "white")
plot(shape@bbox[1,],shape@bbox[2,],type='n',asp=1,axes=FALSE,xlab="",ylab="")
with(subset(df,attr==0),points(lon,lat,pch=20,col="#303030",bg="#303030",cex=0.4))
with(subset(df,attr==1),points(lon,lat,pch=20,col="#E16A3F",bg="#E16A3F",cex=0.4))
plot(shape,add=TRUE,border="black",lwd=0.2)

enter image description here

1) Build grid that covers the entire region of shapefile

# get the bounding box for ROI an convert to a list
bboxROI = apply(bbox(shape), 1, as.list)
# create a sequence from min(x) to max(x) in each dimension
seqs = lapply(bboxROI, function(x) seq(x$min, x$max, by= 0.001))
# rename to xgrid and ygrid
names(seqs) <- c('xgrid','ygrid')
# get borders of entire SpatialPolygonsDataFrame
borders = rbind.fill.matrix(llply(shape@polygons,function(p1) {
    rbind.fill.matrix(llply(p1@Polygons,function(p2) p2@coords))
    }))
# create grid
thegrid = do.call(polygrid,c(seqs, borders = list(borders)))
# add grid points to previous plot
points(thegrid[,1],thegrid[,2],pch=20,col="#33333333",bg="#33333333",cex=0.4)

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
I admire your ambition and I appreciate your description of your approach, but the thing I notice about your post is that is doesn't contain any specific question/s. –  SlowLearner Jun 11 '13 at 5:50
    
Good point. I have updated the question and here is the relevant addition: "First, how do solve my problem with step 1? As the second map below shows, my current approach fails. That is a clear R implementation question and once that is solved, I should be able to complete the other steps. Second and more broadly, is that the right approach or would you suggest a different way to create heatmap with distribution of attribute values?" –  user2503795 Jun 11 '13 at 6:44
    
I've only had a cursory look as I'm not familiar with rbind.fill.matrix but it looks to me as if there is a problem in the borders call with the order of the polygons being passed, with the result that as the function moves from polygon to polygon whole areas are not being filled with points. It reminds me of this problem I had. Sorry, I can't think of anything else right now. –  SlowLearner Jun 11 '13 at 8:10

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