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I'm using Moose and I need to wrap method calls in my project. It's important that my wrapping code be the most outer modifier. What I've done so far is put my method modifiers in a Moose Role and then applied that role at the end of my class like this:

use Moose::Util;
Moose::Util::apply_all_roles(__PACKAGE__->meta, ('App:Roles::CustomRole'));
__PACKAGE__->meta->make_immutable;

This allows me to be reasonably sure that my my role's modifiers are defined last, therefore giving me the correct behavior for "before" and "after." (The "before" and "after" in the role are called very first and very last.)

I originally thought this would be sufficient, but I now really need to wrap methods in a similar way with "around." Class::MOP, which Moose is built on, applies "around" modifiers very first, therefore they're called after "before" and before "after."

For more detail, here is the current calling order of my modifiers:

CUSTOM ROLE before
    before 2
       before 1
           CUSTOM ROLE around
               around
                   method
               around
           CUSTOM ROLE around
       after 1
    after 2
 CUSTOM ROLE AFTER

I really need something like this:

CUSTOM ROLE before
    CUSTOM ROLE around
        before 2
           before 1
               around
                   method
               around
           after 1
        after 2
    CUSTOM ROLE around
 CUSTOM ROLE AFTER

Any ideas on how to get my "around" modifier to be applied / called where I want it to? I know I could do some symbol table hacking (like Class::MOP is already doing) but I'd really rather not.

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1  
I agree with Ether's question below, why are you using Moose::Util::apply_all_roles rather than with? –  perigrin Nov 9 '09 at 20:40
    
I wanted the 'before' and 'after' modifiers in my role to be run very first or very last compared to other modifiers that might exist already in the class. Applying the role manually defines the modifiers later and then the modifiers get run first (for before) and last (for after). –  Matt Wood Nov 9 '09 at 21:57
    
@perigrin I finally understood your and Ether's question. I don't need to apply the role with apply_all_roles like I thought. I'm still new to Moose and got hung up on the idea of needing to apply the role "manually." All I really needed to do was apply it with "with" at the end of the file (after the other modifiers) rather than the begining. –  Matt Wood Nov 10 '09 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Simplest solution is to have CUSTOM ROLE define a method that calls the main method and then wrap that.

role MyRole { 
    required 'wrapped_method';
    method custom_role_base_wrapper { $self->wrapped_method(@_) }

    around custom_role_base_wrapper { ... }
    before custom_role_base_wrapper { ... }
}

The problem you're having is that you're trying to have the CUSTOM ROLE around wrap something other than a method. Which is not what it is designed to do. Other than writing similar symbol table hackery like you've suggested (probably you could argue one of the Moose people into exposing an API in Class::MOP to help get there), the only other solution I can think of is the one above.

If you don't want the extra call stack frame that custom_role_base_wrapper will add, you should look at Yuval's Sub::Call::Tail or using goto to manipulate the call stack.

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I ended up going with the custom wrapper idea. It gave me the flexibility I needed, thanks. –  Matt Wood Nov 24 '09 at 16:23

I'm fairly new to Moose, but why do you do this:

use Moose::Util;
Moose::Util::apply_all_roles(__PACKAGE__->meta, ('App:Roles::CustomRole'));

rather than simply this?

with 'App:Roles::CustomRole';

Regarding your question, it's a bit of a hack, but could you split your around method into before and after methods and apply the role at the end of your class definition (so it is applied in your desired order)? You could use private attributes to save state between the two methods if absolutely necessary.

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1  
The problem is that neither before nor after let you (cleanly) alter the return semantics the way around will. If these semantics are important, you're screwed. If they're not, why are you using around to begin with? –  perigrin Nov 9 '09 at 20:38
    
The reason I apply it manually is that the modifiers are added (and then run) in the order they are defined. Generally you don't care about the order modifiers are run. But, it my case I wanted my role's modifiers to be the very first before and very last after. If you use the "with" syntax to apply the roles its modifiers are defined first and so they'll be run as the inner most "before" and "after." By applying the role manually at the end they are defined last and are therefore run when I want them to be. –  Matt Wood Nov 9 '09 at 21:51
    
@Matt: this does indeed seem to be a shortcoming of Moose. Perhaps the after semantics should allow altering the return value as around does, or the ordering of the before, around and after methods should be modified so they are all LIFO with respect to each other, rather than just to themselves (if that makes sense). –  Ether Nov 10 '09 at 0:34
    
before and after are designed intentionally to not contain side effects like this. Specifically before and after are supposed to be for out-of-band behaviors attached to the method, while around is for just this kind o method "overriding". Altering three year old semantics like that is really not something the Moose team would accept, nor do I think it's really the answer. –  perigrin Nov 21 '09 at 15:25

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