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C#. I have a base class called FileProcessor:

class FileProcessor {
    public Path {get {return m_sPath;}}

    public FileProcessor(string path) 
    {
        m_sPath = path;
    }

    public virtual Process() {}

    protected string m_sath;
}

Now I'd like to create to other classes ExcelProcessor & PDFProcessor:

class Excelprocessor: FileProcessor 
{
    public void ProcessFile()
    {
        //do different stuff from PDFProcessor
    }
}

Same for PDFProcessor, a file is Excel if Path ends with ".xlsx" and pdf if it ends with ".pdf". I could have a ProcessingManager class:

class ProcessingManager
{
    public void AddProcessJob(string path)
    {
        m_list.Add(Path;)
    }

    public ProcessingManager()
    {
        m_list = new BlockingQueue();
        m_thread = new Thread(ThreadFunc);
        m_thread.Start(this);
    }

    public static void ThreadFunc(var param) //this is a thread func
    {
        ProcessingManager _this = (ProcessingManager )var;
        while(some_condition) {
            string fPath= _this.m_list.Dequeue();
            if(fPath.EndsWith(".pdf")) {
                new PDFProcessor().Process();
            }
            if(fPath.EndsWith(".xlsx")) {
                new ExcelProcessor().Process();
            }
        }
    }

    protected BlockingQueue m_list;
    protected Thread m_thread;
}

I am trying to make this as modular as possible, let's suppose for example that I would like to add a ".doc" processing, I'd have to do a check inside the manager and implement another DOCProcessor. How could I do this without the modification of ProcessingManager? and I really don't know if my manager is ok enough, please tell me all your suggestions on this.

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1  
It seems to me that you may benefit from the SOLID design pattern. – Brian Jun 10 '13 at 15:50
    
The simplefactory design pattern could be used as well, but it would require you to add the new option to the manager though. – Jeroen Vannevel Jun 10 '13 at 15:53
1  
you could have a look at the abstract factory design pattern oodesign.com/abstract-factory-pattern.html – terrybozzio Jun 10 '13 at 16:06
    
@JeroenVannevel: We can use the concept of dictionaries. It should be a bit cleaner way I Suppose. – now he who must not be named. Jun 10 '13 at 20:01
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not really aware of your problem but I'll try to give it a shot.

You could be using the Factory pattern.

class FileProcessorFactory {
    public FileProcessor getFileProcessor(string extension){
        switch (extension){
            case ".pdf":
                return new PdfFileProcessor();
            case ".xls":
                return new ExcelFileProcessor();
        }
    }
}

class IFileProcessor{
    public Object processFile(Stream inputFile);
}

class PdfFileProcessor : IFileProcessor {
    public Object processFile(Stream inputFile){
        // do things with your inputFile
    }
}

class ExcelFileProcessor : IFileProcessor {
    public Object processFile(Stream inputFile){
        // do things with your inputFile
    }
}

This should make sure you are using the FileProcessorFactory to get the correct processor, and the IFileProcessor will make sure you're not implementing different things for each processor.

and implement another DOCProcessor

Just add a new case to the FileProcessorFactory, and a new class which implements the interface IFileProcessor called DocFileProcessor.

share|improve this answer
    
It's ok thank you, but what if I have a string representing the output path of the processing and that is common to all incoming file types, should I make it a member variable in the IFileProcessor abstract class or should I take it static into another.. class ? I don t like the idea of setting the processorInstance.outputPath ='xyz' all the time. – Alexandru C. Jun 10 '13 at 16:14
    
What is the purpose of the processing? Only writing to the file system or database? You might want to look at the repository pattern for that. You could let the calling code be responsible for the writing to the filesystem. Or add a variable to IFileProcessor.processFile(Stream inputFile, FileInfo filePath);. – Highmastdon Jun 10 '13 at 16:24
    
Extract values from files and write to other files in output path. – Alexandru C. Jun 10 '13 at 16:29
    
So the return type is really void? If that is so, you can just add the variable to the processFile() method. Or isn't that sufficient? Or you could make the return type IEnumerable or a List<Object>? – Highmastdon Jun 10 '13 at 16:30
    
Well I have to do a hash on the file, write it to an oupput file, extract text write to output file, hash that output file and copy the original file to the output directory. So it will result in: 1 pdf file, 1 file with extracted text and the corresponding hash files. – Alexandru C. Jun 10 '13 at 16:57

You could decorate your processors with custom attributes like this:

[FileProcessorExtension(".doc")]
public class DocProcessor()
{

}

Then your processing manager could find the processor whose FileProcessorExtension property matches your extension, and instantiate it reflexively.

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Nice one, surely didn't knew about those custom attributes. What my manager, is it good enough? – Alexandru C. Jun 10 '13 at 15:52

I agree with Highmastdon, his factory is a good solution. The core idea is not to have any FileProcessor implementation reference in your ProcessingManager anymore, only a reference to IFileProcessor interface, thus ProcessingManager does not know which type of file it deals with, it just knows it is an IFileProcessor which implements processFile(Stream inputFile).

In the long run, you'll just have to write new FileProcessor implementations, and voila. ProcessingManager does not change over time.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation for my solution :) It'll make it more clear for the reader – Highmastdon Jun 10 '13 at 16:14

Use one more method called CanHandle for example:

abstract class FileProcessor 
{
    public FileProcessor() 
    {
    }

    public abstract Process(string path);
    public abstract bool CanHandle(string path);
}

With excel file, you can implement CanHandle as below:

class Excelprocessor: FileProcessor 
{
    public override void Process(string path)
    {
    }

    public override bool CanHandle(string path)
    {
        return path.EndsWith(".xlsx");
    }
}

In ProcessingManager, you need a list of processor which you can add in runtime by method RegisterProcessor:

class ProcessingManager
{
    private List<FileProcessor> _processors;

    public void RegisterProcessor(FileProcessor processor)
    {
        _processors.Add(processor)
    }
    ....

So LINQ can be used in here to find appropriate processor:

while(some_condition) 
{
     string fPath= _this.m_list.Dequeue();

     var proccessor = _processors.SingleOrDefault(p => p.CanHandle(fPath));
     if (proccessor != null)
         proccessor.Process(proccessor);
}

If you want to add more processor, just define and add it into ProcessingManager by using RegisterProcessor method. You also don't change any code from other classes even FileProcessorFactory like @Highmastdon's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
What about the idea of having a common output path that would be read from a config file long before ProcessingManager would start? I don t feel that it is elegant enough to have a another _outputPath member inside FileProcessor class to store it. – Alexandru C. Jun 10 '13 at 16:25
    
@A.K: be honest, I don't understand much your comment, could you update your question for more detail – Cuong Le Jun 11 '13 at 3:39

You could use the Factory pattern (a good choice)

  1. In Factory pattern there is the possibility not to change the existing code (Follow SOLID Principle).
  2. In future if a new Doc file support is to be added, you could use the concept of Dictionaries. (instead of modifying the switch statement)

    //Some Abstract Code to get you started (Its 2 am... not a good time to give a working code)
     1. Define a new dictionary with {FileType, IFileProcessor)
     2. Add to the dictionary the available classes.
     3. Tomorrow if you come across a new requirement simply do this.
         Dictionary.Add(FileType.Docx, new DocFileProcessor());
     4. Tryparse an enum for a userinput value. 
     5. Get the enum instance and then get that object that does your work!
    

Otherwise an option: It is better to go with MEF (Managed Extensibility Framework!)

That way, you dynamically discover the classes.

For example if the support for .doc needs to be implemented you could use something like below:

Export[typeof(IFileProcessor)]
class DocFileProcessor : IFileProcessor
{
    DocFileProcessor(FileType type);

    /// Implement the functionality if Document type is .docx in processFile() here
}

Advantages of this method:

  1. Your DocFileProcessor class is identified automatically since it implements IFileProcessor
  2. Application is always Extensible. (You do an importOnce of all parts, get the matching parts and Execute.. Its that simple!)
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