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I need to be able to run an Oracle query which goes to insert a number of rows, but it also checks to see if a primary key exists and if it does, then it skips that insert. Something like:

INSERT ALL
    IF NOT EXISTS( SELECT 1 WHERE fo.primary_key='bar' )
    (
        INSERT INTO 
            schema.myFoo fo ( primary_key, value1, value2 )
        VALUES
            ('bar','baz','bat')
    ),

    IF NOT EXISTS( SELECT 1 WHERE fo.primary_key='bar1' )
    (
        INSERT INTO 
            schema.myFoo fo ( primary_key, value1, value2 )
        VALUES
            ('bar1','baz1','bat1')
    )
SELECT * FROM schema.myFoo;

Is this at all possible with Oracle?

Bonus points if you can tell me how to do this in PostgreSQL or MySQL.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The statement is called MERGE. Look it up, I'm too lazy.

Beware, though, that MERGE is not atomic, which could cause the following effect (thanks, Marius):

SESS1:

create table t1 (pk int primary key, i int);
create table t11 (pk int primary key, i int);
insert into t1 values(1, 1);
insert into t11 values(2, 21);
insert into t11 values(3, 31);
commit;

SESS2: insert into t1 values(2, 2);

SESS1:

MERGE INTO t1 d
USING t11 s ON (d.pk = s.pk)
WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN INSERT (d.pk, d.i) VALUES (s.pk, s.i);

SESS2: commit;

SESS1: ORA-00001

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1  
Again, without locking the table(or the master record first), there is a race. This method always requires using a temp table. I wouldn't say it's wrong, but sometimes can be just too much. –  Marius Burz Nov 9 '09 at 19:45
    
No, the merge should be atomic. –  erikkallen Nov 9 '09 at 20:07
1  
Yes, MERGE itself is atomic. But... Sess1: INSERT pk=1 INTO myFoo; Sess2: MERGE INTO myFoo d USING tmpTable s ON (d.pk = s.pk)... Sess1: COMMIT; Sess2: ORA-00001; For cases when the number of rows inserted is low, it really doesn't make sense to use a temp table. Everything has its price, and CREATE TABLE and MERGE don't come cheap(look at the required latches/locks and the like). –  Marius Burz Nov 9 '09 at 21:08
    
You don't need a temp table. If you only have a few rows, (SELECT 1 FROM dual UNION SELECT 2 FROM dual) will do. Why would your example give ORA-0001? Wouldn't merge take the update lock on the index key and not continue until Sess1 has either committed or rolled back? –  erikkallen Nov 9 '09 at 21:37
    
Erik, please see the answer below. There wasn't enough space to post it as a comment, nor was any formatting available. –  Marius Burz Nov 9 '09 at 22:17

Coming late to the party, but...

With oracle 11.2.0.1 there is a semantic hint that can do this: IGNORE_ROW_ON_DUPKEY_INDEX

Example:

insert /*+ IGNORE_ROW_ON_DUPKEY_INDEX(customer_orders,pk_customer_orders) */
  into customer_orders
       (order_id, customer, product)
values (    1234,     9876,  'K598')
     ;

UPDATE: Although this hint works (if you spell it correctly), there are better approaches which don't require Oracle 11R2:

First approach—direct translation of above semantic hint:

begin
  insert into customer_orders
         (order_id, customer, product)
  values (    1234,     9876,  'K698')
  ;
  commit;
exception
  when DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX
  then ROLLBACK;
end;

Second aproach—a lot faster than both above hints when there's a lot of contention:

begin
    select count (*)
    into   l_is_matching_row
    from   customer_orders
    where  order_id = 1234
    ;

    if (l_is_matching_row = 0)
    then
      insert into customer_orders
             (order_id, customer, product)
      values (    1234,     9876,  'K698')
      ;
      commit;
    end if;
exception
  when DUP_VAL_ON_INDEX
  then ROLLBACK;
end;
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1  
I like the second approach 'cause it's clear and easy to understand what one is trying to done. –  Diego Deberdt Sep 30 '11 at 9:04

This only inserts if the item to be inserted is not already present.

Works the same as:

if not exists (...) insert ... 

in T-SQL

insert into destination (DESTINATIONABBREV) 
  select 'xyz' from dual 
  left outer join destination d on d.destinationabbrev = 'xyz' 
  where d.destinationid is null;

may not be pretty, but it's handy :)

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2  
Or similar, with exists: insert into destination select 'id', 'xyz' from dual where not exists (select id from destination where id = 'id') –  robinst Jun 14 '12 at 14:32
DECLARE
   tmp NUMBER(3,1);
BEGIN
  SELECT COUNT(content_id) INTO tmp FROM contents WHERE (condition);
  if tmp != 0 then
    INSERT INTO contents VALUES (...);
  else
    INSERT INTO contents VALUES (...);
  end if;
END;

I used the code above. It is long, but, simple and worked for me. Similar, to Micheal's code.

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If you do NOT want to merge in from an other table, but rather insert new data... I came up with this. Is there perhaps a better way to do this?

MERGE INTO TABLE1 a USING DUAL ON (a.C1_pk= 6) WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN INSERT(C1_pk, C2,C3,C4) VALUES (6, 1,0,1);

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It that code is on the client then you have many trips to the server so to eliminate that.

Insert all the data into a temportary table say T with the same structure as myFoo

Then

insert myFoo
  select *
     from t
       where t.primary_key not in ( select primary_key from myFoo)

This should work on other databases as well - I have done this on Sybase

It is not the best if very few of the new data is to be inserted as you have copied all the data over the wire.

share|improve this answer
    
Definitely cleaver +1. I'd have to create a temporary table first, but that really isn't a terrible difficulty. –  cwallenpoole Nov 9 '09 at 19:20
    
correction clever. –  cwallenpoole Nov 9 '09 at 19:26
    
inserting this way is SLOW.... BULK COLLECT is a much better option... google it :) It requires some pl-sql, but it's infinitely faster than a blind insert from a select. –  Matt May 27 '12 at 3:31

This is an answer to the comment posted by erikkallen:

You don't need a temp table. If you only have a few rows, (SELECT 1 FROM dual UNION SELECT 2 FROM dual) will do. Why would your example give ORA-0001? Wouldn't merge take the update lock on the index key and not continue until Sess1 has either committed or rolled back? – erikkallen

Well, try it yourself and tell me whether you get the same error or not:

SESS1:

create table t1 (pk int primary key, i int);
create table t11 (pk int primary key, i int);
insert into t1 values(1, 1);
insert into t11 values(2, 21);
insert into t11 values(3, 31);
commit;

SESS2: insert into t1 values(2, 2);

SESS1:

MERGE INTO t1 d
USING t11 s ON (d.pk = s.pk)
WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN INSERT (d.pk, d.i) VALUES (s.pk, s.i);

SESS2: commit;

SESS1: ORA-00001

share|improve this answer
    
I don't have access to Oracle, so I can't try it, but I believe you. I do think, though, that this should be considered a bug. –  erikkallen Nov 10 '09 at 9:15
2  
this is correct behaviour under the read commited transaction isolation level, not a bug. the behaviour of MERGE is entirely consistent with the behaviour of an update that affects no rows followed by an attempted insert. –  David Aldridge Nov 10 '09 at 10:07
    
@David: I realize that those things are equivalend, but I wonder how many people know this. I sure didn't, and I really expected it to work without problem. If I want the semantics of an INSERT which inserts no rows, then an UPDATE, then I write an INSERT and then an UPDATE. –  erikkallen Nov 10 '09 at 10:20
    
And why -1 for this? It's (apparently) correct, and it taught me something. +1. –  erikkallen Nov 10 '09 at 10:20
    
-1 because it doesn't answer the question, although I agree that it's interesting information. You might add the information into your answer or make yours community wiki so that others can. Also it certainly shouldn't be considered as a bug. –  David Aldridge Nov 10 '09 at 11:57

If your table is "independent" from others (I mean, it will not trigger a cascade delete or will not set any foreign keys relations to null), a nice trick could be to first DELETE the row and then INSERT it again. It could go like this:

DELETE FROM MyTable WHERE prop1 = 'aaa'; //assuming it will select at most one row!

INSERT INTO MyTable (prop1, ...) VALUES ('aaa', ...);

If your are deleting something which does not exist, nothing will happen.

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is there a way to check if some row exist. –  Claudio Santos Oct 28 '13 at 14:49

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