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I'm trying to achieve a StringContext extension which will allow me to write this:

val tz = zone"Europe/London" //tz is of type java.util.TimeZone

But with the added caveat that it should fail to compile if the supplied time-zone is invalid (assuming that can be determined at compile-time).

Here's a helper function:

def maybeTZ(s: String): Option[java.util.TimeZone] =
  java.util.TimeZone.getAvailableIDs collectFirst { case id if id == s =>
    java.util.TimeZone.getTimeZone(id)
  }

I can create a non-macro implementation very easily:

scala> implicit class TZContext(val sc: StringContext) extends AnyVal {
 |   def zone(args: Any *) = {
 |     val s = sc.raw(args.toSeq : _ *)
 |     maybeTZ(s) getOrElse sys.error(s"Invalid zone: $s")
 |   }
 | }

Then:

scala> zone"UTC"
res1: java.util.TimeZone = sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo[id="UTC",offset=0,...

So far, so good. Except that this doesn't fail compilation if the timezone is nonsensical (e.g. zone"foobar"); the code falls over at runtime. I'd like to extend it to a macro but, despite reading the docs, I'm really struggling with the details (All of the details, to be precise.)

Can anyone help to get me started here? The all-singing, all-dancing solution should look to see if the StringContext defines any arguments and (if so), defer calculation until runtime, otherwise attempting to parse the zone at compile-time


What have I tried?

Well, macro defs appear to have to be in statically accessible objects. So:

package object oxbow {
  implicit class TZContext(val sc: StringContext) extends AnyVal {
    def zone(args: Any *) = macro zoneImpl //zoneImpl cannot be in TZContext
  }

  def zoneImpl(c: reflect.macros.Context)
    (args: c.Expr[Any] *): c.Expr[java.util.TimeZone] = {
      import c.universe._
      //1. How can I access sc from here?

      /// ... if I could, would this be right?
      if (args.isEmpty) {
        val s = sc.raw()
        reify(maybeTZ(s) getOrElse sys.error(s"Not valid $s")) 
      }
      else {
        //Ok, now I'm stuck. What goes here?
      }
    }

}

Based on som-snytt's suggestion below, here's the latest attempt:

def zoneImpl(c: reflect.macros.Context)
           (args: c.Expr[Any] *): c.Expr[java.util.TimeZone] = {
  import c.universe._
  val z =
    c.prefix.tree match {
      case Apply(_, List(Apply(_, List(Literal(Constant(const: String)))))) => gsa.shared.datetime.XTimeZone.getTimeZone(const)
      case x => ??? //not sure what to put here
    }

  c.Expr[java.util.TimeZone](Literal(Constant(z))) //this compiles but doesn't work at the use-site
                             ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
                             this is wrong. What should it be?
}

At the use-site, a valid zone"UTC" fails to compile with the error:

java.lang.Error: bad constant value: sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo[id="UTC",offset=0,dstSavings=0,useDaylight=false,transitions=0,lastRule=null] of class class sun.util.calendar.ZoneInfo

Presumably I should not have used a Literal(Constant( .. )) to enclose it. What should I have used?


Last example - based on Travis Brown's answer below

def zoneImpl(c: reflect.macros.Context)
         (args: c.Expr[Any] *): c.Expr[java.util.TimeZone] = {
  import c.universe._
  import java.util.TimeZone

  val tzExpr: c.Expr[String] = c.prefix.tree match {
    case Apply(_, Apply(_, List(tz @ Literal(Constant(s: String)))) :: Nil)
      if TimeZone.getAvailableIDs contains s => c.Expr(tz)
    case Apply(_, Apply(_, List(tz @ Literal(Constant(s: String)))) :: Nil) =>
      c.abort(c.enclosingPosition, s"Invalid time zone! $s")
    case _ => ??? 
//            ^^^ What do I do here? I do not want to abort, I merely wish to 
//                "carry on as you were". I've tried ... 
//                    c.prefix.tree.asInstanceOf[c.Expr[String]]
//                ...but that does not work
  }
  c.universe.reify(TimeZone.getTimeZone(tzExpr.splice))

}
share|improve this question
    
Do you mind performing the getTimeZone lookup at run time, after confirming that the identifier is available at compile time? If so, you can use reify(TimeZone.getTimeZone(c.literal(tz).splice)), where tz is the string. Otherwise you're going to have a hard time smuggling the TimeZone out of the macro. – Travis Brown Jun 10 '13 at 17:16
    
@TravisBrown Indeed, now I see what you mean. – som-snytt Jun 10 '13 at 18:51
    
Thanks, Travis. Could you be more specific? This solution is amenable but I'm not sure where I'm supposed to be putting this. What String tz? – oxbow_lakes Jun 10 '13 at 18:53
    
I don't follow the comment about smuggling the time zone. I think an answer here could be really useful. It strikes me that what I'm doing is intro-level macro stuff and there's so little available in the way of explanation... – oxbow_lakes Jun 10 '13 at 19:00
    
@oxbow_lakes: I've just posted an answer with a bit of explanation, and could flesh it out this evening if you have additional questions. – Travis Brown Jun 10 '13 at 19:05
up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is the "song-and-dance" solution that handles interpolation of the timezone:

package object timezone {
  import scala.language.implicitConversions
  implicit def zoned(sc: StringContext) = new ZoneContext(sc)
}

package timezone {
  import scala.language.experimental.macros
  import scala.reflect.macros.Context
  import java.util.TimeZone

  class ZoneContext(sc: StringContext) {

    def tz(args: Any*): TimeZone = macro TimeZoned.tzImpl

    // invoked if runtime interpolation is required
    def tz0(args: Any*): TimeZone = {
      val s = sc.s(args: _*)
      val z = TimeZoned maybeTZ s getOrElse (throw new RuntimeException(s"Bad timezone $s"))
      TimeZone getTimeZone z
    }
  }
  object TimeZoned {
    def maybeTZ(s: String): Option[String] =
      if (TimeZone.getAvailableIDs contains s) Some(s) else None

    def tzImpl(c: Context)(args: c.Expr[Any]*): c.Expr[TimeZone] = {
      import c.universe._
      c.prefix.tree match {
        case Apply(_, List(Apply(_, List(tz @Literal(Constant(const: String)))))) =>
          maybeTZ(const) map (
            k => reify(TimeZone getTimeZone c.Expr[String](tz).splice)
          ) getOrElse c.abort(c.enclosingPosition, s"Bad timezone $const")
        case x =>
          val rts = x.tpe.declaration(newTermName("tz0"))
          val rt = treeBuild.mkAttributedSelect(x, rts)
          c.Expr[TimeZone](Apply(rt, args.map(_.tree).toList))
      }
    }
  }
}

Usage:

package tztest 

import timezone._

object Test extends App {

  val delta = 8
  //Console println tz"etc/GMT+$delta"  //java.lang.RuntimeException: Bad timezone etc/GMT+8
  Console println tz"Etc/GMT+$delta"
  Console println tz"US/Hawaii"
  //Console println tz"US/Nowayi"     //error: Bad timezone US/Nowayi
}
share|improve this answer
    
How do I "return what I received"? – oxbow_lakes Jun 10 '13 at 16:37
    
See my edit for an update – oxbow_lakes Jun 10 '13 at 16:44
    
I've tried tons of stuff here, trying to reify/splice my time zone (into what expression?), or figure out what sort of expression it is (as it's not a Literal(Constant(..)), to no avail – oxbow_lakes Jun 10 '13 at 17:06
    
Thanks for the edit. This will have the same issue, though. In your case, a String "funk?" is a literal constant. But in my case, my time zone is not. I want to build the expression which is the lookup. Unfortunately one seems to need to know one's DefDef from ones ValDef to have any kind of a clue as to how to create the expression tree. As you imply, the documentation is sparse on such detail. – oxbow_lakes Jun 10 '13 at 18:56
1  
Sorry about that -- I am a bleeding-edge deprecationist. – som-snytt Jun 11 '13 at 18:16

The problem is that you can't smuggle a compile-time instance of TimeZone into the code generated by your macro. You can, however, slip a string literal through, so you can generate code that will construct the TimeZone you want at run time, while still checking at compile time to make sure the identifier is available.

The following is a complete working example:

object TimeZoneLiterals {
  import java.util.TimeZone
  import scala.language.experimental.macros
  import scala.reflect.macros.Context

  implicit class TZContext(val sc: StringContext) extends AnyVal {
    def zone() = macro zoneImpl
  }

  def zoneImpl(c: reflect.macros.Context)() = {
    import c.universe._

    val tzExpr = c.prefix.tree match {
      case Apply(_, Apply(_, List(tz @ Literal(Constant(s: String)))) :: Nil)
        if TimeZone.getAvailableIDs contains s => c.Expr(tz)
      case _ => c.abort(c.enclosingPosition, "Invalid time zone!")
    }

    reify(TimeZone.getTimeZone(tzExpr.splice))
  }
}

The argument to reify will be the body of the generated method—literally, not after any kind of evaluation, except that the tzExpr.slice bit will be replaced by the compile-time string literal (if, of course, you've found it in the list of available identifiers—otherwise you get a compile-time error).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the tidy unapply. Later I'll figure out what the Nil adds to the match (I'll have to count the parens first). This isn't the vaudeville version, all-singing, etc. I wonder if it handles the procrastinator's timezone, "UTC$DelayedInit". – som-snytt Jun 10 '13 at 21:53
    
Yes, I knew (sort of) that I was trying to reify the TimeZone.getTimeZone call but didn't know how. Thanks loads for the help! – oxbow_lakes Jun 11 '13 at 8:01
    
OK, so this works in the REPL. It works in a standalone project. But it does not work in the project where I want to put the code (it's in a package oxbow.scala). I get a compilation error which says "object collection is not a member of package oxbow.scala". Any ideas? – oxbow_lakes Jun 11 '13 at 8:26
    
So, I moved the impl into a sub-package and this compiles. But now I have an extra problem - I want this to compile: val z = "UTC; zone"$z" (it can remain unchecked if necessary). Evidently the expression "$z" is not a literal constant. I've amended my question with your suggestions but have one last question - how do I avoid making the check in the case where the expression is not a literal constant? – oxbow_lakes Jun 11 '13 at 8:34
1  
Hi Eugene - yes, I've done this and it is working a treat! Thanks to both Travis and som-snytt's help here. As an aside, I think this is a useful case study for scalamacros.org – oxbow_lakes Jun 11 '13 at 9:16

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