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I am new to C++ programming and have a problem with one of my programs

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
bool IsPerfect(int n);

int main ()
{
  for(int i=1; i<100; i++){
    IsPerfect(i);
  }

  return 0;
}

bool IsPerfect(int n){
  int sum;
  for(int x=1; x<n; x++){
    if(n%x==0){
      sum+=x;
      return true;
      cout <<n;
    }
    else{
      return false;
    }
  }
}

I am trying to create a program that will list perfect numbers but I can't find the bug as to why it would not print.

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1  
This assignment was taken from CS016B at Stanford. –  idude Jun 10 '13 at 17:12
    
Since you use int storage, which is typically 32 bits, there exist only 6 possible return values (8 possible values for 64 bit integers). A much more efficient implementation would thus be: int perfect(int n) { static int lookup[]={6,28,496,8128,33550336,8589869056};return lookup[n];}. Of course that's probably not what your professor wants to see, but it is totally braindead to calculate something in an elaboreate manner that can be stored in a lookup table with 6 entries... –  Damon Jun 10 '13 at 17:27

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I see 3 issues:

  1. Your algorithm is wrong. Your loop terminates on the first time a number is evenly divisible by any factor (including 1). See Wikipedia for an explanation of the algorithm.
  2. You have an uninitialized variable with int sum; Also, you only ever write to it, you don't read it in a useful manner ever.
  3. You have unreachable code. Your cout << n; in the loop will never be hit.

Try the following corrected code:

#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>
using namespace std;

bool IsPerfect(int n)
{
        int sum = 1;
        for(int x = 2; x < n; ++x)
        {
                if(n % x == 0)
                        sum += x;
        }
        return sum == n;
}

int main ()
{
        for(int i=1; i<100; i++){
                if (IsPerfect(i))
                        cout << i << endl;
        }

        assert(IsPerfect(6));
        assert(IsPerfect(28));
        assert(IsPerfect(496));

        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

You have a return statement before you output statement here:

return true;
cout <<n;

you need to swap the order of these statements, you also probably want to add a comma or some other separator:

std::cout << n << ", " ;
return true;

I am not sure that is where you want to return from since you will exit the first time you enter that if statement, which will happen when x is 1.

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That would make the program print something. –  n.m. Jun 10 '13 at 17:10

If you want to capture perfect numbers - numbers which are equal to the sum of their divisors, correct? - you need to allow the loop to proceed (and the sum to actually, well, sum) without returning. Take your print statement and your return statements and place them after the end of your loop; you should be checking then if the sum you have calculated is equal to n.

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All these answers are telling you to write the number before returning. But that's ignoring the poor design here: you have a function that decides whether a number is perfect; it should not be that function that also decides what to do with this information (print it, store it, send it over the network, ...).

This will also make your code more readable, because the name IsPerfect is misleading - it tells the reader that this function just returns whether the number is perfect. Thus, the loop in the main function reads as, "for the integers 1 to 100, ask whether it is perfect and ignore the answer". This is not a useful program.

Remove the cout line from IsPerfect completely and put it in main instead:

for (int x = 1; x < 100; ++x) {
  if (IsPerfect(x)) {
    std::cout << x << '\n';
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Try this

if(n%x==0){
    sum+=x;
    cout <<n;
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

The issue is in here:

if(n%x==0){
    sum+=x;
    return true;
    cout <<n;
}

the keyword return immediately ends the function and returns the appropriate value (true). This means that all statements following it won't be executed. Try the following:

if(n%x==0){
    sum+=x;
    cout <<n;
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That's not the only problem - if you keep the return statement inside that conditional, it will return any number, because x starts out as 1, and n%1 == 0, so that conditional will always be true on the first (and only) pass through the loop. –  CosmicComputer Jun 10 '13 at 17:14

In addition to the problems others have pointed out, you will never compute the right answer because you didn't initialize your sum variable. Change

int sum;

to

int sum=0;
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