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I heard a lot people saying

int a = 0;
a += 10;

is faster than

int a = 0;
a = a + 10;

Why is that? I debugged it with gdb and it was absolutely the same instructions.

gdb :

First

(gdb) list
1   int main()
2   {
3       int counter = 0;
4       counter = counter + 10;
5       return 0;
6   }
(gdb) disassemble main
Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x00000000004004cc <+0>: push   %rbp
   0x00000000004004cd <+1>: mov    %rsp,%rbp
   0x00000000004004d0 <+4>: movl   $0x0,-0x4(%rbp)
   0x00000000004004d7 <+11>:    addl   $0xa,-0x4(%rbp)
=> 0x00000000004004db <+15>:    mov    $0x0,%eax
   0x00000000004004e0 <+20>:    pop    %rbp
   0x00000000004004e1 <+21>:    retq   
End of assembler dump.

Second

(gdb) list
1   int main()
2   {
3       int counter = 0;
4       counter += 10;
5       return 0;
6   }

(gdb) disassemble main
Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x00000000004004cc <+0>: push   %rbp
   0x00000000004004cd <+1>: mov    %rsp,%rbp
   0x00000000004004d0 <+4>: movl   $0x0,-0x4(%rbp)
   0x00000000004004d7 <+11>:    addl   $0xa,-0x4(%rbp)
=> 0x00000000004004db <+15>:    mov    $0x0,%eax
   0x00000000004004e0 <+20>:    pop    %rbp
   0x00000000004004e1 <+21>:    retq   
End of assembler dump.

So why is "(variable) += (value)" faster than "(variable) = (variable) + (value)" ?

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15  
What kind of people are these people? –  glglgl Jun 10 '13 at 17:14
    
Dunno. Saw many people on forums. Even here on stackoverflow. –  Davlog Jun 10 '13 at 17:15
2  
If the instructions are the same, then it's not faster. Anyway, this depends on the compiler since the standard doesn't specify behavior. –  m0skit0 Jun 10 '13 at 17:15
1  
This is true for old compilers, and maybe some pic compiler. Gcc is smart enough to optimize this. –  Jonatan Goebel Jun 10 '13 at 17:19
1  
Imagine a literal 8051 compiler. For option 2 (reading from right to left), you have MOV R1,#10; MOV R0,A; ADD A,R1 (load, load, add) For option 1 you have MOV A,#10; ADD A,R0 (load, add). –  Jonatan Goebel Jun 10 '13 at 18:55

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

As others said, in this case it doesn't matter. However, there are some similar but very different cases:

int *f(void);
(*f()) = (*f()) + 1;
(*f()) += 1;

In the 2nd line, f() is called twice, in the 3rd line just once.

int * volatile *p;
**p = **p + 1;
**p += 2;

In the 2nd line, the compiler will read *p twice, assuming it may change between accesses (and you'd be reading one place, writing another). In the 3rd, it will read *p once and increment this place.

And if you're feeling naughty:

#define a *f()
int a;
a = a + 1;
a++;

Looks almost exactly as in the question, but behaves like my first example.

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It's not faster. As you see, the generated assembly is identical. Whoever told you one is faster was making up stories.

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1  
Not exactly. It probably comes from the fact that in C++, the first could be faster since it does not construct a temporary. Whoever told that to OP was probably mixing C and C++. –  Park Young-Bae Jun 10 '13 at 17:16
3  
Even in C++ any modern compiler is going to "do the right thing". Regardless, the question is tagged C, the OP demonstrated that they're identical, and that's about the end of that... –  Carl Norum Jun 10 '13 at 17:16
1  
Yes, I was just providing a reasonable explanation behind OP's question... –  Park Young-Bae Jun 10 '13 at 17:17
    
Gotcha. That's a reasonable interpretation, though I think the sentiment of these "one is faster"-sayers is a bit misguided. –  Carl Norum Jun 10 '13 at 17:17
2  
a and b are ints. This C++ talk has nothing to do with the question, anyway. –  Carl Norum Jun 10 '13 at 17:19

I think you just proved that it is not faster at all for whichever c compiler you are using. However, you may have optimizations running during the compile. Also, other compilers may not do that the same way.

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I think what they meant by "faster" is that its easier to type a += 10 than a = a + 10. Both are completely identical otherwise.

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You have to look at this on a compiler by compiler basis, and option by option. Unoptimized it might generate different code, but at the same time unoptimized is going to likely be much slower even for this single one line of code. The real answer has to do with the compiler internals which you can see really easy with clang/llvm, but maybe with gcc and others. By the time it generates assembly it is well down the road, compilers tend to have an internal generic code that gets some optimization then the final conversion to assembly/machine code has further target specific optimization. The interesting answer to your question is what does the compiler frontend do with those two subtle different lines of code? If not from the very beginning at what point do those two join and become the same result at or on the way to the assembly/machine code output?

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2  
Though true in principal, I find it hard to imagine in what way the two could differ. –  ugoren Jun 10 '13 at 18:33
    
Agreed... . . . –  dwelch Jun 10 '13 at 20:18

No. You had incorrect information. Both the instructions take up the same time.

Both

int a = 0;
a += 10;

and

int a = 0;
a = a + 10;

generate the same assembly code and are having equal speed.

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