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I'm trying to enable GZip compress for SVG in an Azure Web Site using web.config transforms without success. Here is what my transform looks like:

<configuration xmlns:xdt="http://schemas.microsoft.com/XML-Document-Transform">
  <system.webServer>
    <httpCompression>
      <staticTypes>
        <add mimeType="image/svg+xml" enabled="true" xdt:Transform="Insert" />
      </staticTypes>
    </httpCompression>
    <staticContent xdt:Transform="Insert">
      <mimeMap fileExtension=".svg" mimeType="image/svg+xml" />
    </staticContent>
  </system.webServer>
</configuration>

This should both add the mime type for SVG, which Azure doesn't seem to have, and then enable compression. I've verified the mime type addition works fine, but upon publishing I get an error for the compression elements:

No element in the source document matches '/configuration/system.webServer/httpCompression/staticTypes'

Removing the compression from the transform and adding it directly to my web.config file removes the error, but I still don't see the compression in the HTTP headers. Here are the response headers:

Accept-Ranges:bytes
Content-Length:23265
Content-Type:image/svg+xml
Date:Mon, 10 Jun 2013 17:19:37 GMT
ETag:"c4e9ec93d765ce1:0"
Last-Modified:Mon, 10 Jun 2013 12:39:41 GMT
Server:Microsoft-IIS/8.0
X-Powered-By:ASP.NET
X-Powered-By:ARR/2.5
X-Powered-By:ASP.NET
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is how you can enable it in your web.config:

<configuration>
   <system.webServer>
      <staticContent>
         <mimeMap fileExtension=".svg" mimeType="image/svg+xml" />
      </staticContent>
      <httpCompression>
         <staticTypes>
           <remove mimeType="*/*" />
           <add mimeType="image/svg+xml" enabled="true" />
           <add mimeType="*/*" enabled="false" />
         </staticTypes>
      </httpCompression>
   </system.webServer>
</configuration>

The key line is the removal of the catch-all (and later re-add). If you don't have that, then the svg line basically gets ignored since the catch-all is inherited from applicationhost.config, and catches all before it reaches svg line.

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I have the following configuration entries for an Azure Web-Site:

    <system.webServer>
       <urlCompression doStaticCompression="true" doDynamicCompression="true" />
    </system.webServer>

and

  <mimeMap fileExtension=".svg" mimeType="image/svg+xml" />
  <!-- Scalable Vector Graphics iPhone, iPad -->
  <mimeMap fileExtension=".svgz" mimeType="image/svg+xml" />

I have added the .svgz extension as well (for compressed svg).

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Unfortunately it isn't possible to use built-in http compression on Azure Websites for image/xml+svg mime types. You have to change some IIS settings to do that which is possible if you're using Azure Web Roles.

I didn't want to go through that hassle however so I just made a controller in MVC to handle .svg files.

[AttributeRouting.RoutePrefix("static")]
public class ContentController : Controller
{
    [GET(@"fonts/{fileName:regex(^[\w-\.]+\.svg$)}")]
    [Compress, OutputCache(
        Duration = 3600 * 24 * 30,
        Location = OutputCacheLocation.Any,
        VaryByContentEncoding = "gzip;deflate",
        VaryByParam = "fileName")]
    public ActionResult SvgFont(string fileName)
    {
        var path = Server.MapPath("~/Content/fonts/" + fileName);
        if (!System.IO.File.Exists(path)) return HttpNotFound();
        return File(path, "image/svg+xml");
    }
}

public class CompressAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        filterContext.HttpContext.CompressResult();
    }
}

public static class HttpContextExtensions
{
    public static bool CompressResult(this HttpContextBase context)
    {
        var request = context.Request;
        var response = context.Response;
        if (request == null || response == null) return false;
        var filter = response.Filter;
        if (filter is GZipStream || filter is DeflateStream) return false;
        var acceptEncoding = (request.Headers["Accept-Encoding"] ?? string.Empty).ToLowerInvariant();
        if (acceptEncoding.Contains("gzip"))
        {
            response.Filter = new GZipStream(filter, CompressionMode.Compress);
            response.AddHeader("Content-Encoding", "gzip");
            response.AppendHeader("Vary", "Content-Encoding");
            return true;
        }
        if (acceptEncoding.Contains("defalte"))
        {
            response.Filter = new DeflateStream(filter, CompressionMode.Compress);
            response.AddHeader("Content-Encoding", "deflate");
            response.AppendHeader("Vary", "Content-Encoding");
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
}

You will also need to add this to your Web.config file so that MVC will handle routes with a .svg extension

<system.webServer>
  <handlers>
    <add name="StaticMvcHandler" path="static/fonts/*.svg" verb="GET" type="System.Web.Handlers.TransferRequestHandler" preCondition="integratedMode,runtimeVersionv4.0" />
  </handlers>
</system.webServer>
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