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i have a User Model and Address Model. when i do @user=User.all it returns

  {  "id" : "1",
    "firstname" : "test",
    "username" : "test",   
  },
  {  "id" : "2",
    "firstname" : "test1",
    "username" : "test2",       
  }  

and when i do @address =Address.all

{   "id" : "21",
    "user_id" : "1",
    "city" : "test",
    "country" : "test",   
  },
  {  "id" : "22",
     "user_id" : "2",
     "city" : "test1",
     "country" : "test2",       
  }  

i get above value

Now i want to merge both value that is @user and @ddress in a single Hash. like ex-

   {  "id" : "1",
     "firstname" : "test",
     "username" : "test",   
     "id" : "22",
     "user_id" : "1",
     "city" : "test1",
     "country" : "test2",   
    },
   {  "id" : "2",
     "firstname" : "test2",
     "username" : "test2", 
     "id" : "22",
     "user_id" : "2",
     "city" : "test1",
     "country" : "test2",         
   }    

How to do this?

share|improve this question
    
There is a .merge method, which will do most of what you want. However, your example hashes have repeated key "id" which cannot work in Ruby's Hash class. Without the repeat id, just combo_hash = user_hash.merge( address_hash ) –  Neil Slater Jun 10 '13 at 19:04
    
Hi @NeilSlater When i do so i get "undefined method `merge' for #<Users id: 1>" –  Gagan Jun 10 '13 at 19:10
1  
why don't you use eager loading concept here? Like @users = User.includes(:addresses).all. Now this object has users and related addresses. NOw when you do @users.first.addresses this will give you all the addresses associated with first user in the hash/returned object. PS: I am assuming there is an one to many association between user and address models. –  Manoj Monga Jun 10 '13 at 19:19
    
If you're more into SQL, you may use joins. I mean guides.rubyonrails.org/… –  cdshines Jun 10 '13 at 22:56

2 Answers 2

One possible way to solve this issue is to alias the duplicate column in the select clause. For your address model, when you pull up each record, you can do the following:

@addresses = Address.select("id AS address_id, user_id, city, country").all

Now the ID column of your address model hash should not conflict with the ID column of your user hash. You can then merge them as Neil Slater suggested, using:

combo_hash = user_hash.merge(address_hash)
share|improve this answer

Index one array by "id" into a hash:

users_by_id = {}
@users.each {|h| users_by_id[h['id']] = h}

Next step, merge into the second hash:

@address.map do |address| 
   # search the user with the same id
   u = users_by_id[address['user_id']]
   if u
     # rename 'id' key
     u['uid'] = u['id']
     address.merge(u)
   else
     address # no user matched!
   end
end
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