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I recently changed my database structure and now I want to copy from my old table Transfers to the new ones I just created (Orders and Orders_Transfer):

--old table to copy from
-- table 'Transfers'
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Transfers] (
    [Id] int IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Date] datetime  NOT NULL,
    [Memo] nvarchar(max)  NULL,
    [Employee_Id] int  NULL,
    [InventoryFrom_Id] int  NOT NULL,
    [InventoryTo_Id] int  NOT NULL,
);

-- new tables to copy to
-- table 'Orders'
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Orders] (
    [Id] int IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Date] datetime  NOT NULL,
    [Memo] nvarchar(max)  NULL,
    [Employee_Id] int  NULL
);

-- Creating table 'Orders_Transfer'
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Orders_Transfer] (
    [Id] int  NOT NULL,--foreign key on Orders.Id
    [InventoryFrom_Id] int  NOT NULL,
    [InventoryTo_Id] int  NOT NULL
);

I want to iterate through the old Transfers table and copy some part of it to Orders (Date, Memo, Employee) and the rest to Orders_Transfer (InventoryFrom_Id, InventoryTo_Id). The Id column in Orders_Transfer is also a FK on Orders.Id so I want to copy the auto-generated value as well. I read about the scope_identity() function and the OUTPUT clause, but I’m a beginner to SQL and can’t put it all together.

I’m using SQL Server 2008

What is the query I need to do this? Any help would be appreciated, thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would create an OldId column on the Orders table to store the old primary key:

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Orders] ADD [OldId] INT;

Then copy in the old data:

INSERT INTO [dbo].[Orders]
(
[OldId],[Date],[Memo],[EmployeeID]
)
SELECT [Id] AS [OldId],[Date],[Memo],[EmployeeID]
FROM [dbo].[Transfers];

Copy the remaining data using the OldId:

INSERT INTO [dbo].[Orders_Transfer] 
(
    [Id],
    [InventoryFrom_Id],
    [InventoryTo_Id]
)
SELECT
O.Id, T.[InventoryFrom_Id], T.[InventoryTo_Id]
FROM [dbo].[Orders] O
INNER JOIN [dbo].[Transfers] T
ON O.[OldId] = T.[Id];

And drop the OldId column:

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Orders] DROP COLUMN [OldId];
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this looks good, very crafty, I'll try it right now and if it works I'll mark it as answer, thanks –  agugglez Jun 10 '13 at 19:31

To keep the Id values in sync you are going to need to use IDENTITY_INSERT.

SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Orders ON;

/* Insert data into the Orders table */
INSERT INTO [dbo].[Orders]
       ([Id]
       ,[Date]
       ,[Memo]
       ,[Employee_Id])
SELECT Id
     , Date
     , Memo
     , Employee_Id
  FROM Transfers;

SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Orders OFF;

/* Insert data into the Orders_Transfer table */
INSERT INTO [dbo].[Ordres_Transfer]
           ([Id]
           ,[InventoryFrom_ID]
           ,[InventoryTo_ID]
SELECT Id
     , InventoryFrom_ID
     , InentoryTo_ID
  FROM Transfers;
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, I realize it's not clear in my question but the Orders table has more data already, it isn't really new, the Id's have to be generated. –  agugglez Jun 10 '13 at 19:30
Insert into newtable select * from oldtable      //if same schema
insert into newtable(col1,col2,col3) select col1,col2,col3 from old table  // for different table schema
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