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I asked a similar question earlier for which Nokogiri was recommended as a solution. I've used Nokogiri and it certainly works fine.

But due to certain reasons, I must use regex to extract a keyword from a HTTP response body.

Format of the keyword is as follows:

<HTML>
<HEAD> <TITLE>TestExample [Date]</TITLE></HEAD>
</HTML>

Here, Date is a dynamic variable, and I need to extract 'TestExample [Date]' from the HTTP response body. Also, <title> can be lower or upper case.

Assuming 'response' has the http response, I have tried doing the following:

>> response
=> "<HTML>\n<HEAD> <TITLE>TestExample [Date]</TITLE></HEAD>\n</HTML>"

Then make a regex to search:

>> regex
=> /<title>TestExample (.*?)<\/title>/mi

When I do a response[regex] there are no results. No results with response.match(regex) and response.scan(regex).

How can I do this task using regex?


Update:

For this task, this regex works fine:

response.match(/<title>(.*)<\/title>/mi).captures.first
share|improve this question
1  
I guess it is a typo, update "/title<TestExample (.*?)<\/title>/mi" to "/title>TestExample (.*?)<\/title>/mi" –  Thiago Lewin Jun 10 '13 at 19:38
2  
I'm lost. Why can't you use nokogiri to get the contents of <title>, then regex search the contents? –  Joe Frambach Jun 10 '13 at 19:39
    
@tlewin Yes, that was a typo. Thanks for noticing. I've been staring at the screen for too long. :) –  Sunshine Jun 10 '13 at 19:58
1  
Those "certain folks" shouldn't tell you how to write code then, because their method is wrong. –  the Tin Man Jun 10 '13 at 20:02
1  
security related!? Just show them this page: stackoverflow.com/questions/1732348/… –  the Tin Man Jun 10 '13 at 20:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As other people said, Regex is not the way to go. If you're really bound to using Regexes (not just being too lazy to refactor?), this should do the trick:

response.match(/<title>(.*)<\/title>/mi).captures.first
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. It sure works. :) ... I am noobie but not too lazy. :) ... as I mentioned earlier, I have used Nokogiri for other tasks but for this one, I must use regex only. Could you please tell about captures.first? –  Sunshine Jun 10 '13 at 20:03
    
Ok then, no offense i was just trying to find out ;-) I'm just curoius: Why can't you use Nokogiri? –  p11y Jun 10 '13 at 20:07
1  
captures gives you the capture groups, i.e. the parts of the regex enclosed in parentheses (...) as an array. first will give you the first element of the array. –  p11y Jun 10 '13 at 20:08
    
Thank you @padde –  Sunshine Jun 10 '13 at 20:09
    
I've seen HTML with duplicated and multiple <title> tags, which would cause this to behave badly, especially when the <head> block was repeated after the body. –  the Tin Man Jun 10 '13 at 20:30

The correct way to handle this IS using a parser. Nokogiri will handle every requirement you stated, without breaking because of case differences or a difference in date.

require 'nokogiri'

doc = Nokogiri::HTML(<<EOT)
<HTML>
<HEAD> <TITLE>TestExample [Date]</TITLE></HEAD>
</HTML>
EOT
doc.at('title').text
=> "TestExample [Date]"

doc = Nokogiri::HTML(<<EOT)
<HTML>
<HEAD> <TITLE>TestExample [1/1/2000]</TITLE></HEAD>
</HTML>
EOT
doc.at('title').text
=> "TestExample [1/1/2000]"

doc = Nokogiri::HTML(<<EOT)
<HTML>
<HEAD> <TiTlE>TestExample [Jan. 1, 2000]</tItLe></HEAD>
</HTML>
EOT
doc.at('title').text
=> "TestExample [Jan. 1, 2000]"

doc.title
=> "TestExample [Jan. 1, 2000]"
share|improve this answer
    
just curious, can I locate the keyword if it is anywhere in the http response? –  Sunshine Jun 10 '13 at 20:42
    
The keyword? You mean tag? If it's in the parsed HTML body, yes. More importantly, it won't be fooled if "<title>" is in text somewhere, unlike a regex which would have a very hard time telling. –  the Tin Man Jun 10 '13 at 21:47

You can try with this pattern too:

/(?<=<title>)[^<]++/i

[^<] means all characters but < (character class)
[^<]+ means 1 or more characters from this class
[^<]++ means 1 or more characters from this class, and be possessive

a possessive quantifier informs the regex engine that it doesn't need to backtrack, thus performances are better.

example:

response.match(/(?<=<title>)[^<]++/i)

the idea is to not use the dot and replace it by a character class that exclude <

Note that the result is the whole pattern, no need to use capture group here and no need to test what is coming after. I remove the m modifier (that stand for DOTALL) cause i don't use the dot.

I just control with a lookbehind that there's <title> before.

share|improve this answer
    
What is [^<]++? That's not part of Ruby's Regexp engine. –  the Tin Man Jun 10 '13 at 20:28
    
>> response.match(/(?<=<title>)[^<]++/i) SyntaxError: compile error (irb):3: undefined (?...) sequence: /(?<=<title>)[^<]++/ from (irb):3 –  Sunshine Jun 10 '13 at 20:28
    
@Sunshine: Lookbehind are only available for ruby 1.9 –  Casimir et Hippolyte Jun 10 '13 at 20:36
    
@theTinMan: see my edit for more explanations –  Casimir et Hippolyte Jun 10 '13 at 20:36
    
@theTinMan: The Regexp engine supports possessive quantifiers. –  Casimir et Hippolyte Jun 10 '13 at 21:20

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