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This came up in a project for class. The question may be a little too long winded, but since I don't really know where exactly the issue could be, it might be useful to draw it out in full.

Let's say we have a structure of the form:

typedef struct
{
    char *name;
    char **friends;
    int numFriends;
} User;

And we have some container for the structure:

typedef struct
{
    User *users;
    int db_size;
} DB;

We also have two functions for managing friends:

void makeFriends(char *name1, char *name2, DB *db)
{
    User user1 = findByName(name1);
    User user2 = findByName(name2);

    user1.friends[numFriends] = name2;
    user2.friends[numFriends] = name1;

    user1.numFriends++;
    user2.numFriends++;

    update_db(user1, db);
    update_db(user2, db);
}

void unmakeFriends(char *name1, char *name2, DB *db)
{
    User user1 = getByName(name1);
    User user2 = getByName(name2);

    for (int i = 0; i < user1.numFriends; ++i)
    {
        if (strcmp(user1.friends[i]), name2)
        {
            int size = 0;
            char *newFriendList = malloc(APPROPRIATE_AMOUNT);


            for (int j = 0; j < count; ++i)
            {
                if (j != i)
                {
                    newFriendList[size] = user1.friends[j];
                    size++;
                }
            }

            user1.friends = newFriendList;
            user1.numFriends = size;

            // this breaks things for some reason
            //free(newFriendList);
        }
    }

    // and the same for user2

    for (int i = 0; i < user2.numFriends; ++i)
    {
        if (strcmp(user2.friends[i]), name2)
        {
            int size = 0;

            // this can lead to the corruption of user1's list
            // char *newFriendList = malloc(APPROPRIATE_AMOUNT);
           // but this works fine
           char *newFriendList = calloc(someNum, APPROPRIATE_AMOUNT);


            for (int j = 0; j < count; ++i)
            {
                if (j != i)
                {
                    newFriendList[size] = user2.friends[j];
                    size++;
                }
            }

            user2.friends = newFriendList;
            user2.numFriends = size;

            // this breaks things for some reason
            //free(newFriendList);
        }
    }

    update_db(user1, db);
    update_db(user2, db);
}

We create three users, giving them a name and allocating some memory for their list of friends:

User vladimir = { .name = "Vladimir", .friends = malloc(APPROPRIATE_AMOUNT), 0 };
User estragon = { .name = "Estragon", .friends = malloc(APPROPRIATE_AMOUNT), 0 };
User pozzo = { .name = "Pozzo", .friends = malloc(APPROPRIATE_AMOUNT), 0};

Now, let's say Vladimir and Estragon want to become friends, and then Estragon and Pozzo also become friends. Some time passes, and Vladimir and Estragon decide they don't really like each other, so one of them unfriends the other one.

If I run the function unmakeFriends and use malloc twice, the first user's list of friends becomes corrupted (like names appearing twice or other undefined behaviour) during the second loop. If I use calloc twice, I get that or bus errors. If I attempt to free the memory, I get bus errors. If I use the code the way it is now, one as malloc, the other as calloc, it works as intended.

What is happening and why?

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You need to create a linked list of friends, so you can take one out of the middle of the list. Each entry in the list has its own memory allocated/freed, and the other entries are left alone. Google "linked list c tutorial". –  Floris Jun 10 '13 at 20:20

1 Answer 1

calloc 0 initializes the buffer that you dynamically allocate. malloc just leaves it as junk.

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