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The following code does not compile with G++ (although I believe it should):

#include <iostream>

template <unsigned N>
struct foo_traits {
    typedef const char ArrayArg[N];
    typedef int Function (ArrayArg *);
};

template <unsigned N>
int foo (typename foo_traits<N>::Function *ptr) {
    return ptr(&"good");
}

int bar (const char (*x)[5]) {
    std::cout << *x << "\n";
    return 0;
}

int main ()
{
    return foo(bar);
}

I checked this with GCC 4.4 through 4.7, and I get a template argument deduction failure. With 4.7.1:

prog.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
prog.cpp:21:19: error: no matching function for call to ‘foo(int (&)(const char (*)[5]))’
prog.cpp:21:19: note: candidate is:
prog.cpp:10:5: note: template<unsigned int N> int foo(typename foo_traits<N>::Function*)
prog.cpp:10:5: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
prog.cpp:21:19: note:   couldn't deduce template parameter ‘N’

If I use an explicit template argument (i.e., foo<5>(bar)), it compiles fine. If I use a version of the code without the typedefs, it compiles fine:

#include <iostream>

template <unsigned N>
int fixfoo (int (*ptr) (const char (*)[N])) {
    return ptr(&"good");
}

int bar (const char (*x)[5]) {
    std::cout << *x << "\n";
    return 0;
}

int main ()
{
    return fixfoo(bar);
}

Is the failing code supposed to compile (i.e., did I make a silly mistake)?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
int foo(typename foo_traits<N>::Function *ptr);

The signature makes it a non-deductible context, so you must include the template arguments so that the value N is known and so consequentially the type of the pointer ptr be known as well.

Your second example compiles because the type of the signature through bar can be deduced.

share|improve this answer
    
What causes something to be in a "non-deductible context". Is that language from the standard? –  jxh Jun 10 '13 at 21:22
    
@jxh I'm not sure if it's terminology from the Standard, but think about it: typename foo_traits<N>::Function* ptr requires the signature to know the value of N before the argument is past. What if foo_traits has different specializations based on the value of N, and therefore has different types for Function based on those values? –  0x499602D2 Jun 10 '13 at 21:25
    
foo and foo_traits, are not instantiated until the call where the type of the argument to foo is known. Are you saying the compiler is not able to deduce the template argument for foo_traits even knowing the type of the supplied function argument to foo? –  jxh Jun 10 '13 at 21:36
    
@jxh Yup, that's correct. And its most likely for the reasons I said in my last comment. –  0x499602D2 Jun 10 '13 at 21:38
    
Scratch that last question, I'll write a new question. –  jxh Jun 10 '13 at 21:43

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