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I am new to Haskell.

I have this code (my solution to one of the exercise from Ninety-Nine Haskell Problems)

data Structure a = Single a | Multiple (a, Int) deriving (Show) 

encodeM ::(Eq a)=> [a]->[Structure a]

encodeM l = map(\x -> (let size = length x
            --h = head x
            in if size>1 then Multiple ( head x, size) else Single (head x)
            )
          ) $ group l

When I uncomment "-h = head x" I get: "parse error on input `='"

But

xxx l= let size = length l  
   h = head l
      in  size

works fine, why it doesn't compile when I use "let" with multiple statement inside the lambda?

I have tried to replace let by where

encodeM2 ::(Eq a)=> [a]->[Structure a]

encodeM2 l = map(\x->if si>1 then Multiple ( head x, si) else Single (head x)
   where si = length x)

but it doesn't compile as well, whats wrong with it?

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3 Answers 3

This is your code properly indented: (note how the let bindings align vertically)

encodeM :: Eq a => [a] -> [Structure a]
encodeM l = map (\x -> let size = length x
                           h = head x in
                       if size > 1
                          then Multiple (h, size)
                          else Single h) $
              group l

This is your code readable:

encodeM :: Eq a => [a] -> [Structure a]
encodeM = map runLength . group
  where
    runLength x =
      let size = length x
          h = head x in
      if size > 1
         then Multiple (h, size)
         else Single h

This is your code idiomatic:

encodeM :: Eq a => [a] -> [Structure a]
encodeM = map runLength . group
  where
    runLength [x] = Single x
    runLength xs = Multiple (head xs, length xs)
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Thanks a lot. When you come to new language, very often you have to change you habits (which you got from languages you already now) and adjust it to the new syntax and different way of thinking. I appreciate your advice. –  Blezz Jun 11 '13 at 11:09

I prefer to use pattern matching to if/then/else, so your code becomes:

encodeM :: (Eq a) => [a] -> [Structure a]
encodeM lst = map fun $ group lst
              where
                fun [x] = Single x
                fun l = Multiple (head l, length l)
share|improve this answer
    
Yep agree its more elegant, thx. –  Blezz Jun 11 '13 at 11:09

In Haskell whitespace matters.

Align assignemnts in your let. And you can't use where in lambda.

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