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I am trying to change the Opacity of the main application window through a settings window popup in real time. What is the proper way of doing this?

So far, I have tried using a Slider to output the value to the settings file. When the settings popup is closed, the main window refreshes its opacity property based on the settings file. This method works but I'd like the ability to change the opacity and view the result in real time.

The second method I tried was using a Style and applying it to the MainWindow. Then on slider move, the style would be overridden with the value from the slider. This works in real time. But for whatever reason, the settings popup window opacity is also affected even though no style is applied to it.

Here is a sample project named OpacityTest with a main window, a button to open settings popup and slider to control the program's opacity.

App.xaml:

<Application x:Class="OpacityTest.App"
             xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
             StartupUri="MainWindow.xaml">
    <Application.Resources>
        <Style TargetType="Window" x:Key="wrapper">
            <Setter Property="OverridesDefaultStyle" Value="false"/>
            <Setter x:Name="opacitySetter" Property="Opacity" Value="1"/>
        </Style>
    </Application.Resources>
</Application>

MainWindow.xaml:

<Window x:Class="OpacityTest.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525" Style="{DynamicResource wrapper}" Background="#FFCDCDCD" AllowsTransparency="True" WindowStyle="None">
    <Grid>
        <StackPanel HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center">
            <Button Content="Settings" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center" Width="75" Click="Button_Click"/>
        </StackPanel>
    </Grid>
</Window>

New window labeled Settings, Settings.xaml:

<Window x:Class="OpacityTest.Settings"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="Settings" Height="300" Width="300">
    <Grid>
        <StackPanel HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center">
            <Slider x:Name="ChangeTransparency" MinWidth="138" MinHeight="22" VerticalAlignment="Center" Padding="0" Orientation="Horizontal" HorizontalAlignment="Center" Value="1" Minimum=".05" Maximum="1" LargeChange=".01" SmallChange=".01" TickFrequency="100" IsSnapToTickEnabled="False" MouseMove="ChangeTransparency_MouseMove"/>
        </StackPanel>
    </Grid>
</Window>

MainWindow.xaml.cs:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Data;
using System.Windows.Documents;
using System.Windows.Input;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System.Windows.Media.Imaging;
using System.Windows.Navigation;
using System.Windows.Shapes;

namespace OpacityTest
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            Settings settings = new Settings();
            settings.ShowDialog();
        }
    }
}

Settings.xaml.cs

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Text;
    using System.Threading.Tasks;
    using System.Windows;
    using System.Windows.Controls;
    using System.Windows.Data;
    using System.Windows.Documents;
    using System.Windows.Input;
    using System.Windows.Media;
    using System.Windows.Media.Imaging;
    using System.Windows.Shapes;

    namespace OpacityTest
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Interaction logic for Settings.xaml
        /// </summary>
        public partial class Settings : Window
        {
            public Settings()
            {
                InitializeComponent();
            }

            private void ChangeTransparency_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
            {
                Style style = new Style { TargetType = typeof(Window) };
                style.Setters.Add(new Setter(OpacityProperty, Opacity = ChangeTransparency.Value));
                Application.Current.Resources["wrapper"] = style;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
It's a bit obvious. Don't change the style, that affects all windows that use that style. Change the window's Opacity instead. – Hans Passant Jun 11 '13 at 0:45
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like your Style is behaving as if it were declared in a XAML file in a way that affects all Windows, not just the wrapper style, e.g.

<Style TargetType="Window"> ... </Style>

Instead of:

<Style TargetType="Window" x:Key="wrapper"> ... </Style>

I'm not immediately sure of how to declare it the way you're trying to, but a much easier way to accomplish what you're trying to do is to put this in MainWindow.xaml.cs:

private void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    Settings settings = new Settings();
    this.SetBinding(OpacityProperty,
                  new Binding("Value") { Source = settings.ChangeTransparency });
    settings.ShowDialog();
}

No handler on ChangeTransparency is required this way. The only reason I might consider modifying the Style instead is if you can have multiple MainWindows at once, and want one Settings window (opened from any of them) to control them all at once.

As an aside, if you do find that you need to attach to ChangeTransparency, you should attach a handler to its ValueChanged event instead of MouseMove (while MouseMove will generally work out, it's really not the same; e.g. for keyboard input, only ValueChanged will fire).

If Settings can be used from other windows and/or has more properties, you might wish to change Settings to take a Window (or other type) in its constructor, and set up the binding(s) there instead, to keep your code/logic centralized and clean.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It works. – MCSharp Jun 11 '13 at 1:33
    
I also agree with using ValueChangedfor the event. The reason I went with MouseMoveis because the value of the slider loads from a settings file as soon as the settings window is open. This throws a 'System.NullReferenceException' error because I have a label attached to the value to show the percentage. Since the label is null at the time the value changed due to loading from settings, there is an error. – MCSharp Jun 11 '13 at 13:59
1  
@MiddleCSharp Ah, I see. Better (IMHO) ways of handling that would be to either put a null check in your handler (e.g. if (myLabel != null) ...) or a bool to indicate when you're loading, to prevent handlers from erroring or doing weird things, like saving the default value of 1 over your settings (e.g. at the start of your constructor, set a bool isLoading field to true; at the end of it, set it to false; in your ValueChanged handler, only do it if isLoading is false). – Tim S. Jun 11 '13 at 14:29
    
You're absolutely correct. I've been checking with if (myLabel == null) {give it a value} which still resulted in an error. But checking if not equal is the way to go. Would it be possible to use the same method of binding to bind a CornerRadius to a Border? I haven't seen a BorderRadius property that works in this manner. – MCSharp Jun 11 '13 at 20:28
1  
Yep, should be possible. See CornerRadius and CornerRadiusProperty. If it doesn't work as-is, you might need to write an IValueConverter to use as a Converter that takes a double and returns a CornerRadius. – Tim S. Jun 11 '13 at 20:31

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