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I was trying to reproduce a result in Python from MATLAB. However, I can't seem to get it right. This is the correct MATLAB code:

nx = 5;
ny = 7;

x = linspace(0, 1, nx); dx = x(2) - x(1);
y = linspace(0, 1, ny); dy = y(2) - y(1);

onex = ones(nx, 1);
oney = ones(ny, 1);

Dx = spdiags([onex -2*onex onex], [-1 0 1], nx, nx);
Dy = spdiags([oney -2*oney oney], [-1 0 1], ny, ny);

Ix = eye(nx); Iy = eye(ny);
L = kron(Iy, Dx);

size(L) % 35   35

Now, this is the Python code:

nx = 5
ny = 7
x = linspace(0, 1, nx); dx = x[1] - x[0]
y = linspace(0, 1, ny); dy = y[1] - y[0]

onex = ones(nx)
oney = ones(ny)
Dx = sparse.dia_matrix( ([onex, -2*onex, onex], [-1,0,1] ), shape=(nx,nx))
Dy = sparse.dia_matrix( ([oney, -2*oney, oney], [-1,0,1] ), shape=(ny,ny))

Ix = eye(nx)
Iy = eye(ny)

L = kron(Iy, Dx)

L.shape # (7, 7)

As far I have been able to verify, everything is correct until the definition of L. According to MATLAB kron(Iy, Dx) (which is supposed to be the kronecker product) should produce a 35X35 matrix, but Python thinks it should be a 7X7 matrix. In simpler calculations, both give the correct answer:

Python:

kron(array(([1,2],[2,3])), [1,2])

array([[1, 2, 2, 4],
       [2, 4, 3, 6]])

MATLAB

kron([1 2; 2 3], [1 2]) 

ans = 1   2   2   4
      2   4   3   6

Why do I get different results?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Wild guess: do things behave better if you use Dx.todense() or Dx.toarray() (and the same for Dy?) –  DSM Jun 11 '13 at 3:42
    
Exactly right. Minutes ago I was trying to construct the matrix I used without scipy.sparse. Do you know a workaround when using sparse matrices? –  Robert Smith Jun 11 '13 at 3:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use sparse.kron for the Kronecker product of sparse matrices.

numpy.kron does not handle sparse matrices. When given sparse matrices, it might not generate an error, but the value it returns will not be correct.

share|improve this answer
    
Works great. Thanks! –  Robert Smith Jun 11 '13 at 15:34

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