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rake db:migrate is failing on my developement server, the error is:

Mysql2::Error: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for
 at line 1: {:username=>"user", :password=>"user"}D:/WorkSpace/Ruby_WorkSPace/SLA_Rails_june10/db/migrate/20130611053608
d:in `migrate'
Tasks: TOP => db:migrate
(See full trace by running task with --trace)

My migration code is:

class User < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :users do |t|
      t.column :username , :string 
      t.column :password , :string
    end
    User.create :username=>"user" ,:password=>"user"
    User.create :username=>"admin" ,:password=>"admin"
  end

  def self.down
    drop_table :users
  end
end

enter code here

my model code is

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :username, :password
end
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Your migration class most definitely should not be named identically to your User model. –  Deefour Jun 11 '13 at 6:05
1  
@Deefour : if I remove the User.create line , then it works fine creating the table –  Hussain Akhtar Wahid 'Ghouri' Jun 11 '13 at 6:08
    
I'm just pointing out why you're having the issue you're asking about. The migration will run within without the model instantiation because you're no longer referring to class methods that don't exist. –  Deefour Jun 11 '13 at 6:16
    
@Deefour : so can i name the migration class "Users" from User ?? –  Hussain Akhtar Wahid 'Ghouri' Jun 11 '13 at 6:18
    
I suggest reading the Rails Guide on the topic. Your migration should be more appropriately named CreateUsers or similar. As it stands your User migration class is in a naming conflict with your User model class. –  Deefour Jun 11 '13 at 6:22

2 Answers 2

Use the rails command to create migration scripts:

rails g scaffold User username:string password:string

That command will generate the following script. Then you can add "seeds".

class CreateUsers < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :users do |t|
      t.string :username
      t.string :password

      t.timestamps
    end
    User.create(:username=>"user", :password=>"user")
    User.create(:username=>"admin", :password=>"admin")
  end
end

By the way, note that the initial data should be located in db/seeds.rb

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dont wanna use scaffolding –  Hussain Akhtar Wahid 'Ghouri' Jun 11 '13 at 6:53

Migration code:

class User < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :users do |t|
      t.column :username , :string 
      t.column :password , :string
    end
    User.create :username=>"user", :password=>"user"
    User.create :username=>"admin",:password=>"admin"
  end

  def self.down
     drop_table :users
  end
end

Model code:

 class User < ActiveRecord::Base
   attr_accessible :username, :password
 end

In the code above, you are creating two users, while creating table.

Rails has a 'seeds' feature that should be used for seeding a database with initial data. It's a really simple feature: just fill up db/seeds.rb with some Ruby code, and run rake db:seed

So you just remove the create statements and your migration code should be like this:

 class User < ActiveRecord::Migration
   def self.up
     create_table :users do |t|
       t.column :username , :string 
       t.column :password , :string
     end
    end

   def self.down
     drop_table :users
   end
 end

After creating the table, just fill your db/seeds.rb to feed database table:

user = [{:username=>"user", :password => "user"}, {:username=>"admin", :password => "admin"}]

User.create(user)

Then run: rake db:seed

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