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In C#, it's possible to declare a struct (or class) that has a pointer type member, like this:

unsafe struct Node
{
  public Node* NextNode;
}

Is it ever safe (err.. ignore for a moment that ironic little unsafe flag..) to use this construction? I mean for longterm storage on the heap. From what I understand, the GC is free to move things around, and while it updates the references to something that's been moved, does it update pointers too? I'm guessing no, which would make this construction very unsafe, right?

I'm sure there are way superior alternatives to doing this, but call it morbid curiosity.

EDIT: There appears to be some confusion. I know that this isn't a great construction, I purely want to know if this is ever a safe construction, ie: is the pointer guaranteed to keep pointing to whatever you originally pointed it to?

The original C-code was used to traverse a tree (depth first) without recursion, where the tree is stored in an array. The array is then traversed by incrementing a pointer, unless a certain condition is met, then the pointer is set to the NextNode, where traversal continues. Of course, the same can in C# be accomplished by:

struct Node
{
  public int NextNode;
  ... // other fields
}

Where the int is the index in the array of the next node. But for performance reasons, I'd end up fiddling with pointers and fixed arrays to avoid bounds checks anyway, and the original C-code seemed more natural.

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The GC does not move areas of memory that have been pinned to a memory location using the fixed keyword. –  Robert Harvey Nov 9 '09 at 21:14
2  
+1 for morbid curiosity –  Bruno Reis Nov 9 '09 at 21:15
4  
why would you want to do that in the first place ? –  Thomas Levesque Nov 9 '09 at 21:15
    
However, fixed can only be used in local scope (i.e. you cannot pin something and return it from a method without unpinning it first), which kinda limits the uses. –  Pavel Minaev Nov 9 '09 at 21:40
    
JulianR, in my mind you haven't provided a good reason yet why you can't replace struct by class and simply use a reference... –  Henk Holterman Nov 9 '09 at 22:20
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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Is it ever safe to use this construction? I mean for long term storage on the heap.

Yes. Doing so is usually foolish, painful and unnecessary, but it is possible.

From what I understand, the GC is free to move things around, and while it updates the references to something that's been moved, does it update pointers too?

No. That's why we make you mark it as unsafe.

I'm guessing no, which would make this construction very unsafe, right?

Correct.

I'm sure there are way superior alternatives to doing this, but call it morbid curiosity.

There certainly are.

is the pointer guaranteed to keep pointing to whatever you originally pointed it to?

Not unless you ensure that happens. There are two ways to do that.

Way one: Tell the garbage collector to not move the memory. There are two ways to do that:

  • Fix a variable in place with the "fixed" statement.

  • Use interop services to create a gc handle to the structures you wish to keep alive and in one place.

Doing either of these things will with high likelihood wreck the performance of the garbage collector.

Way two: Don't take references to memory that the garbage collector can possibly move. There are two ways to do that:

  • Only take addresses of local variables, value parameters, or stack-allocated blocks. Of course, in doing so you are then required to ensure that the pointers do not survive longer than the relevant stack frame, otherwise, you're referencing garbage.

  • Allocate a block out of the unmanaged heap and then use pointers inside that block. In essense, implement your own memory manager. You are required to correctly implement your new custom memory manager. Be careful.

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A complete answer, thank you :) I think I'll opt for the much simpler "store an index integer to the next node" method, was gonna do that anyway, but yeah, morbid curiosity. –  JulianR Nov 10 '09 at 1:12
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Why not:

struct Node
{
    public Node NextNode;
}

or at least:

struct Node
{
    public IntPtr NextNode;
}

You could use the fixed statement to prevent the GC to move pointers around.

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2  
I don't see how this answers the question? He's asking in what situations would you do this, not what alternatives there are. –  Greg Beech Nov 9 '09 at 21:14
3  
Ok, then let's answer the question: never use this construction. –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 9 '09 at 21:15
    
Sorry, but this isn't what I'm asking. I know there are other ways to do this (first one won't work for me though), just want to know if this could even work at all. –  JulianR Nov 9 '09 at 21:15
4  
Oh come on, you haven't defined what do you mean by work. It will compile, yes, but in what context are you using this? –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 9 '09 at 21:17
3  
The first version is simply broken and won't compile, because it's trying to define a recursive struct. The second version gives nothing over a proper pointer type - it lets one omit unsafe, but you'll need pointer casts when you actually use the field, and those will need unsafe. So what's the point? –  Pavel Minaev Nov 9 '09 at 21:41
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Yes, the garbage collector can move the objects around and, no, it will not update your pointers. You need to fix the objects you point to. More information can be found on this memory management explanation.

You can fix objects like this:

  unsafe {
     fixed (byte* pPtr = object) {
         // This will fix object in the memory
        }
     }
  }

The advantages of pointers are usually performance and interaction with other unsafe code. There will be no out-of-bounds checks etc, speeding up your code. But just as if you were programming in e.g. C you have to be very careful of what you are doing.

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Yes, but it's not fixed not long enough to be useful in a linked list. –  Henk Holterman Nov 9 '09 at 21:22
    
Fixing is always done within a certain context (for example a method) and while you could do something silly like fixing it in your main method, this would cause fragmentation. So fixing would not be suitable for longterm storage. –  JulianR Nov 9 '09 at 21:34
1  
I definitely don't see how this answers his question. –  ChaosPandion Nov 9 '09 at 21:36
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Some obvious integrity checks have been excluded. The obvious problem with this is you have to allocate more than you will need because you cannot reallocate the buffer as the keyword fixed implies.

public unsafe class NodeList
{
    fixed Node _Nodes[1024];
    Node* _Current;

    public NodeList(params String[] data)
    {
    	for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
    	{
    		_Nodes[i].Data = data[i];
    		_Nodes[i].Next = (i < data.Length ? &_Nodes[i + 1] : null);		
    	}

    	_Current = &_Nodes[0];
    }

    public Node* Current()
    {
    	return _Current++;	
    }
}

public unsafe struct Node
{
    public String Data;
    public Node* Next;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 interesting. But indeed not very usable. –  JulianR Nov 9 '09 at 21:40
    
It is quite usable as long as you keep your lists smaller than 1024. –  ChaosPandion Nov 9 '09 at 21:41
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A dangerous idea, but it may work:

When your array of structs exceeds a certain size (85000 bytes) it will be allocated on the Large Object Heap where blocks are scanned and collected but not moved...

The linked article points out the danger that a newer CLR version might move stuff on the LOH...

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I may be just too young but why would you want to use pointer in c# ?

Isn't that code just ok for self referencing ?

public class Node
{
    //this is by-ref 
    public Node Next;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You could, but that's not the question he's asking. :) –  Robert P Nov 9 '09 at 21:36
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