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Sorry for asking such a basic question, but I just can't figure it out and I have no idea how to search for it.

I have the following code:

letters = new ArrayList<JButton>();
String[] abc = new String[] {"A", "Á", "B", "C", "D", "E", "É", "F", "G", "H", "I", "Í", "J", "K", "L", "M", "N", "O", "Ó", "Ö", "Ő", "P",
        "Q", "R", "S", "T", "U", "Ú", "Ü", "Ű", "V", "W", "X", "Y", "Z" };
for (Object o: abc)
{
    letters.add(new JButton((String)o));
    int i = letters.size() - 1;
    letters.get(i).setBounds(i%10 * 60 + 40, 350 + ((i / 10) * 50), 55, 45);
    letters.get(i).addActionListener(new ActionListener()
    {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event)
        {
            System.out.println(o);
        }
    });
    mF.add(letters.get(i));
}

As you can see, I have a for loop and I'd like to use its variable 'o' inside the function. How can I do that? It says:

java: local variable o is accessed from within inner class; needs to be declared final

What exactly does this mean?

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3  
make it final, for (final Object o: abc) –  Nandkumar Tekale Jun 11 '13 at 9:18
    
Define one final object and use that object to iterate loop –  shreyansh jogi Jun 11 '13 at 9:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the for loop, write like this:

for (final Object o: abc)
{
    ...

So the compiler knows that the object o will not change, i.e. you will not assign a new value to it with =.

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Thanks, it works. I will accept it as soon as I can. :o –  Martin Fejes Jun 11 '13 at 9:20

It means that to be accessed in an inner class, the compiler has to be sure that this variable cannot be modified, as the code will be probably be executed asynchronously. change for (Object o: abc) to for (final String o: abc)

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you can not perform System.out.println(o);

as o is not defined as final.

for (final Object o: abc)
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letters.get(i).addActionListener(new ActionListener()
{
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event)
    {
        System.out.println(o);
    }
});

Is creating an inner class, simply make the foreach loop use final Object o.

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it is not the array instantiation that is creating an inner class, it is the new ActionListener ... –  gma Jun 11 '13 at 9:21
    
quite sure, yes. new String[] {"A", ....} is just creating an instance, not a Class, new ActionListener(... does as he is overriding actionPerformed method –  gma Jun 11 '13 at 9:25
    
@gma you are aboslutely right, I was thinking of double brace initialization –  NimChimpsky Jun 11 '13 at 9:26

You are using an anonymous inner class, and from within those classes you may access final variables declared outside. Here's an example which will not work because message is not final:

public void myMethod() {
    String message = "You can't see me";

    new SomeInterface() {

        //SomeInterface declares this method:
        public void someMethod() {
            System.out.println(message); //this will not compile
        }
    };
}

But this will work because message is final:

public void myOtherMethod() {
    final String message = "You can see me now!";

    new SomeInterface() {

        //SomeInterface declares this method:
        public void someMethod() {
            System.out.println(message); //this will work!
        }
    };
}
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