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I have a table in which are stored (among-st other bits) the IP address,*date* and a SERIAL PK for each and every attempt to log on to my site.

logon table: logref SERIAL, ipaddress CHAR(20),logtime DATETIME,logresult (BOOL) (1=success)

What I would like to do, is count the number of false or incorrect logon from each ip address in a given time span, after the last valid logon from that ip address.

What I have so far is:

SELECT ipaddress FROM logon 
    WHERE logref>=
    (
    SELECT MIN(logref) FROM logon WHERE 
    TIMESTAMPDIFF( HOUR , logtime,'2013-06-10 22:00:00' )<12
    )
    AND logresult=0
    GROUP BY ipaddress

Which gives me a list of all the IP addresses from which there has been a failed logon attempt.

I have been trying to merge this with another SQL:

SELECT COUNT( logref ) AS count
FROM logon
WHERE logname = '$user'
AND  TIMESTAMPDIFF( HOUR ,logtime,'$timenow')<=$locktime
AND logref>(SELECT logref FROM logon 
WHERE logname = '$user'
AND logresult='1'
ORDER BY logtime DESC LIMIT 1)

Which nicely counts the number of failed logon attempts in $locktime from a given user.

Sadly, I am quite new to subqueries and I get lost trying to nest them.

Essentially the idea is that I should be able to count the number of incorrect logons per ip to reduce the risk Denial Of Service attacks and computerised logon-guess attacks.

Recaptcha etc are not workable solutions in this case - it must be a logname/password combination only.

Because so many people will log in from the same IP address due to NAT, it is not sufficient just to lock out IPs with a given number of falsies in the last x hours, it really needs to be where there has been a certain number since the last correct logon.

A whitelist will not work as there are likely to be many people accessing from many IPs - though most logons will be from a workplace, some will be from homes too.

I will automatically blacklist any IP address with 12 (or better number if you would suggest) or more failed logons and no correct logons.

Any comments on:

How many failed logons might be expected from a given IP when there are no shenanigans going on (guidance on the initial security parameters)

Whether there is a better way of doing this.

How many failed logons without a good logon ever should be allowed from a given IP address before it is automatically locked out.

How often this sort of scheme just annoys genuine users

Would be greatly appreciated, as, of course, would be the solution for my tickly SQL problem.

share|improve this question
1  
On every logon attempt: increment a "failed logons" counter against the user's record if the attempt was unsuccessful, or else reset the counter if the attempt was successful. –  eggyal Jun 11 '13 at 10:34
    
Then throttle login attempts with exponential backoff, as described by Jeff in Dictionary Attacks 101. –  eggyal Jun 11 '13 at 10:39
    
Thanks @eggyal, that would work. I'm still keen for a full sql solution, if it can be done (keen to learn more about subqueries too) –  Robert Seddon-Smith Jun 11 '13 at 10:58
    
What do you mean "a full SQL solution"? Handling logon attempts is application logic, is it not? –  eggyal Jun 11 '13 at 11:02
    
The second SQL I provided works really well for the usernames - it simply returns the number of bad logons for a given username since the last good one. It is elegant. It is not difficult to implement this in PHP and SQL but, aesthetically, this is what SQL is for. There is a lot of PHP wrapped round the sql to use the returned results of course. If anyone is feeling kind, sqlfiddle.com/#!2/97c31/1 is set up with sample data and the sql provided below (which does not quite do the job) –  Robert Seddon-Smith Jun 11 '13 at 11:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

figure out the last good logon by ipaddress

SELECT
  max(logref) max_logref,
  ipaddress
FROM logon
WHERE logresult = TRUE
GROUP BY ipaddress

Updated

This will give you logins that have not had a good login in the timescale (last day)

SELECT 
  ipaddress, 
  count(*)
FROM 
  logon
WHERE logtime > date_sub(now(), interval 1 day)
GROUP BY ipaddress
having max(logresult) = false

you can then figure out bad login counts

SELECT 
  logon.ipaddress, 
  count(*) bad_logins
FROM
  logon 
JOIN ( 
    SELECT
      max(logref) max_logref,
      ipaddress
    FROM logon
    WHERE logresult = TRUE
    AND logtime > date_sub(now(), interval 1 day) 
    GROUP BY ipaddress  
  ) good 
ON
  logon.ipaddress = good.ipaddress and 
  logon.logref > good.max_logref 
GROUP BY
  logon.ipaddress 


UNION

SELECT 
  ipaddress, 
  count(*)
FROM 
  logon
WHERE logtime > date_sub(now(), interval 1 day)
GROUP BY ipaddress
having max(logresult) = false

see sqlfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - that extracts a list of ip addresses with failed logons but does not include the time limit :-( It also has a lot of NULL ip addresses, which are, I presume, those where the logon was successful. Much appreciated though. Is it even possible to achieve what I ask in a single SQL query? –  Robert Seddon-Smith Jun 11 '13 at 11:01
    
you can add the timelimit to the subquery - something like : WHERE logresult = TRUE AND TIMESTAMPDIFF( HOUR ,logtime,'$timenow')<=$locktime –  Ian Kenney Jun 11 '13 at 11:34
    
Awesome thank you so much. This does exactly what I need. I' really enjoyng learning more about SQL. Annoyingly, having slept on the problem, I realised that it was not necessary to be so complex. Of course, when a bad logon attempt occurs, I already have the suspect IP available so a variant of the second SQL I presented will do the job on the fly. Yours will be very handy for security audits though and will help me develop the necessary lockout numbers. Once again, thank you. –  Robert Seddon-Smith Jun 11 '13 at 20:10

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