Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to iterate through date ranges without using libraries (ie Joda). I wrote that simple code but got strange results. For example, for dates 2010-01-01 2010-02-01 it prints:

1.0.2010
2.0.2010
3.0.2010
4.0.2010
5.0.2010
6.0.2010
7.0.2010
8.0.2010
9.0.2010
10.0.2010
11.0.2010
12.0.2010
13.0.2010
14.0.2010
15.0.2010
16.0.2010
17.0.2010
18.0.2010
19.0.2010
20.0.2010
21.0.2010
22.0.2010
23.0.2010
24.0.2010
25.0.2010
26.0.2010
27.0.2010
28.0.2010
29.0.2010
30.0.2010
31.0.2010
1.1.2010

the problem exists also for dates: 2010-05-01 2010-06-01 (prints april instead of may). Any help?

import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Date;
import java.text.DateFormat;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.DateFormatSymbols;
import java.util.Locale;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.HashMap;
import javax.swing.JOptionPane;
import java.util.GregorianCalendar;

class test
{
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");
        Date startDate = null, endDate = null;

        try 
        {
            startDate = dateFormat.parse("2010-01-01"); // or 2010-05-01
            endDate = dateFormat.parse("2010-02-01"); // or 2010-06-01
        } 
        catch (ParseException pe) 
        {
            System.exit(-1);
        }

        Calendar start = Calendar.getInstance();
        start.setTime(startDate);
        Calendar end = Calendar.getInstance();
        end.setTime(endDate);

        for (Date date = start.getTime(); !start.after(end); start.add(Calendar.DATE, 1), date = start.getTime()) 
        {
            Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
            cal.setTime(date);
            int year = cal.get(Calendar.YEAR);
            int month = cal.get(Calendar.MONTH);
            int day = cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
            int dow = cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);  
            System.out.printf("%d.%d.%d\n", day, month, year);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Why are you using Calendar when better alternatives are available? –  vikingsteve Jun 11 '13 at 10:19
4  
Months are indexed from 0. 0-> JAN, 1-> FEB ..... –  Peter Jaloveczki Jun 11 '13 at 10:21
3  
Just because no one's mentioned it yet - the JavaDoc for the Calendar class would have told you this docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Calendar.html#MONTH. This should be your port-of-call if you see behaviour you don't expect from a library –  Disco 3 Jun 11 '13 at 10:32
    
Maybe the docs suck. Its really annoying when people answer questions with, look at the doc, and then a link to a thing the poster probably already glanced at but didnt get. –  David Williams Feb 21 at 18:51
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Month that the library return start at 0 .. 11

Also your loop could be simplified liked this. Note that this might not be the best solution.

while(!start.after(end)) 
{
    int year = start.get(Calendar.YEAR);
    int month = start.get(Calendar.MONTH) + 1;
    int day = start.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
    System.out.printf("%d.%d.%d\n", day, month, year);        
    start.add(Calendar.DATE, 1);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.