Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Currently I'm working on an iOS application, in which I'm using structure for storing some data.

I declared an structure like:

typedef struct Message
{
    int    messageType;
    char   *data;
    int    length;
} Message;

But when I need to declare a variable I accidentally wrote like:

struct Message *myMessage = NULL;

This is working fine, no issues.

My question is why this line not displaying any issues ?

Both :

struct Message *myMessage = NULL;

and

Message *myMessage = NULL;

Working correctly. Is this correct behavior of typedef ? Why it won't display any error when I used struct Message ?

share|improve this question
1  
Its a standard practice with naming conventions that if you have 'typedef'ed structure, then the name should be followed by '_t'. For example, it should be Message_t. :) –  user2045557 Jun 11 '13 at 12:54
    
@WedaPashi: Thanks for the information. –  Midhun MP Jun 11 '13 at 13:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, it's correct.

The name following the keyword struct, called the "struct tag", is not in the same "name space" as the typedef alias name. That's why they're not colliding and generating some kind of error.

That said, you should remove the tag from your declaration, and just make it:

typedef struct
{
    int    messageType;
    char   *data;
    int    length;
} Message;

No point in introducing names that are not needed, and that would also protect you from this kind of confusion since there would be no name to write struct before.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer :) –  Midhun MP Jun 11 '13 at 12:33
    
There could be a point in naming the struct tag the same as the typedef though, in the case you have self-referencing structs, like for example a node in a linked list: typedef struct node { node* next; int data; } node;. This make it possible to link such a struct, as the struct tag is visible to the struct declaration itself, but the typedef name is not. –  Lundin Jun 11 '13 at 12:44

Yes, this is expected. struct Message is a type, and your typedef has created Message as an alias for it. You can use either when declaring variables.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer :) –  Midhun MP Jun 11 '13 at 12:33

The above declares both struct Message and its "alias" as Message. Both is fine.

share|improve this answer

This is the correct behavior of typedef.

share|improve this answer

May be that is why, We have been suggested to follow the naming convention for typedef as I said above.

struct Message {  
    int messageType;  
    char *data;  
    int length;  
}Message_t;  

Above is the good practice to declare struct with their typedef. And in embedded you will usually find it to be, Message_Type.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.