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I have a query for which I want to obtain results, and count of the results, at the same time. The filtering of the results is complex, so I can not simply use the subquery trick as in this other question. My ultimate goal is to filter the results based on the result count.

Example:

SELECT id, related_info, count(related_info) FROM my_table WHERE <complex filtering on related_info here>;

Results should look like:

id | related_info |  count(related_info)|
1  |         info1|                    3|
1  |         info2|                    3|
1  |         info3|                    3|
2  |         info1|                    2|
2  |         info2|                    2|

My ultimate goal is to filter the results based on the count, for example:

SELECT id, related_info, count(related_info) FROM my_table WHERE <complex filtering on related_info here> having count(related_info) >=3;

Results should look like:

id | related_info |  count(related_info)|
1  |         info1|                    3|
1  |         info2|                    3|
1  |         info3|                    3|
(results for id 2 are filtered)

I can not use group by because I want to get all the results. I can not use a subquery, because it would imply to perform the complex filtering twice.

I don't see any way to perform this with a single query.

share|improve this question
    
You need to provide source data structure, so we can help you to query it in the way you want. – Stoleg Jun 11 '13 at 12:22
    
@Stoleg: well, you can simply imagine a table with two columns, id and related_info, the primary key being (id, related_info) (so that you get duplicated id in the table). I do not want to get the number of rows corresponding to a specific id, but the number of rows corresponding to my where clause. – FBB Jun 11 '13 at 12:38
    
I don't unserstand how you can use an aggregate function without a GROUP BY clause and have more than one row in your resultset. – Olivier Coilland Jun 11 '13 at 12:40
    
It was just an example of what I want to achieve, the query is not correct (if it was, I wouldn't be asking this question :p). I know that you always need to use group by with an aggregate function. So I am asking for an alternative way to get the kind of results I showed. I think it is not possible, but I ask to the community anyway. – FBB Jun 11 '13 at 12:43
1  
@Djebel . . . Can you use rollup and get the results on another row? – Gordon Linoff Jun 11 '13 at 12:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following query:

SELECT id, related_info, count(related_info)
FROM my_table
WHERE <complex filtering on related_info here>
group by id, related_info with rollup

would produce results like:

id | related_info |  count(related_info)|
1  |         info1|                    1|
1  |         info2|                    1|
1  |         info3|                    1|
1  |         NULL |                    3|

rollup adds an extra row with the summary information.

The solution is easy in most databases:

SELECT id, related_info, count(related_info) over (partition by id)
FROM my_table
WHERE <complex filtering on related_info here>

Getting the equivalent in MySQL without repeating the where clause is challenging.

A typical alternative in MySQL, if you need the list of "related_info" is to use group_concat:

select id, group_concat(related_info), count(*)
from my_table
where <complex filtering on related_info here>
group by id;

And a final method, assuming that related_info is a single column that uniquely identifies each row:

select mt.id, mt.related_info, t.cnt
from my_table mt join
     (select id, group_concat(related_info) as relatedInfoList, count(*) as cnt
      from my_table
      where <complex filtering on related_info here>
      group by id
     ) t
     on mt.id = t.id and
        find_in_set(related_info, relatedInfoList) > 0

This turns "related_info" into a list and then matches back to the original data. This can also be done with a unique id in the original data (which id is not based on the sample data).

share|improve this answer
    
This is the best answer so far, but could you then imagine a way of filtering the results based on this rollup? Because otherwise, I need an extra filtering step, something I could already do in the first place. – FBB Jun 11 '13 at 12:54
1  
Does the final result in the question and answer look same? Would you get any other value for Count(related_info) other than 1 (except totals)? Then I was answering a completely different question. – Stoleg Jun 11 '13 at 13:13
1  
These are two different answers. If you need subtotals and totals - use Gordon's answer, as this is when you would use partition by and rollup. My answer is a hack, in case you want to have a number from the summary alongside your detail data. – Stoleg Jun 11 '13 at 13:34
1  
@Djebel . . . Stoleg's answer is appropriate if the filtering is at the id level. If the filtering is within an id, then the count will be right, but the number of rows wrong. The find_in_set() hack is a way to get around that problem. – Gordon Linoff Jun 11 '13 at 13:37
1  
@Djebel, then Gordon's last query is same as mine. I probably should have joined on related info. – Stoleg Jun 11 '13 at 13:47

Try using the Count analytical function. The syntax is COUNT(*) OVER (PARTITION BY ...). You can find more here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189461.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't it SQL Server specific? This question is tagged mysql. – FBB Jun 11 '13 at 12:53
    
I stand corrected. Analytical functions are only supported on Oracle and MS SQL Server. – Marius Jun 11 '13 at 13:59

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