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I have a small piece of code in Assemby which is basiclly run through a loop and print values in reverse order but when I run, it goes to infinte loop.Below is the code .

section .data
x db "value=%d"
section .text
global main
extern printf
main:
mov eax, 10
well_done:
push eax
push x

call printf
add esp,8
dec eax
cmp eax ,0
jnz well_done
ret
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There's a push but no pop? –  Kerrek SB Jun 11 '13 at 12:18
3  
eax is caller-save in cdecl, printf is probably killing its value –  harold Jun 11 '13 at 12:22
    
@kerrek May I know why pop is required in this particular case . –  Amit Singh Tomar Jun 11 '13 at 12:37
    
I don't know - I'm not claiming to understand it, I just noticed the asymmetry. –  Kerrek SB Jun 11 '13 at 12:38
4  
You can't restore it from this anyway, a function may modify its arguments - that's not overly common, but you can't really rely on it. You can either push eax twice (and pop it after the call, obviously), or use a callee-save register like ebx –  harold Jun 11 '13 at 12:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since it's too long for a comment, I'll just put it here: what I meant with using a callee-save register is something like this

section .data
x db "value=%d"

section .text
global main
extern printf

main:
  mov ebx, 10
well_done:
  push ebx
  push x
  call printf
  add esp, 8
  dec ebx
  jnz well_done
  ret

Note that usually using ebx means that you should save ebx on entry and restore it on exit, but because this is main we get away with not doing that.

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to the point "The return value isn't pushed, it goes in eax (well, in most cases)",I believe where ever call printf is executed first thing it do is to push return to stack but not alter the esp ,something which I was told by Peter Wright in "stackoverflow.com/questions/16960337/…; in the answer to this question.Would you like to say something on the same. –  Amit Singh Tomar Jun 11 '13 at 14:22
    
Oh the return address, yes, a call pushes that and then jump. A ret pops the address* and jumps to it. * it pops something and interprets it as an address, regardless of whether or not it's actually a valid address. –  harold Jun 11 '13 at 14:23
    
What about altering the ESP??Will call pushes alter the esp? and final point why really in your code add esp,8 is required, anyway ebx has value 10 which we can use it without point esp to right location. –  Amit Singh Tomar Jun 11 '13 at 14:41
    
call and ret change esp yes. add esp, 8 is required to get rid of the arguments that you gave printf (unlike in stdcall, in cdecl the caller cleans the stack). You can get away with not cleaning the stack for a while, but then the last ret will pop the wrong thing and probably crash. If the loop was longer, stack overflow could become an issue as well. –  harold Jun 11 '13 at 14:52
    
Thanks Again Harold for your kind inputs,it will help me a lot going forward. –  Amit Singh Tomar Jun 11 '13 at 14:58

When you call a function you must be sure which registers are used. If you call a C function eax can be used for whatever the function needs it, so you must push eax before you execute the function, and after it returned you can pop it.

section .data
x db "value=%d"
section .text
global main
extern printf
main:
mov eax, 10
well_done:
push eax   <- save the counter
push eax   <- argument for printf
push x

call printf
add esp,8   <- clears the stack with the arguments for printf
pop eax   <- restore the counter
dec eax
cmp eax ,0
jnz well_done
ret
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Thanks Everyone for the help .This is how I did as sugested by Harold.Thanks Harold

section .data
x db "value=%d"
section .text
global main
extern printf
main:
mov ebx, 10
well_done:
push ebx
push x

call printf
add esp,4
pop ebx
dec ebx
cmp ebx ,0
jnz well_done
ret
share|improve this answer
    
Anyways @Devolus using register eax also working fine for me,replace ebx with eax makes no difference. –  Amit Singh Tomar Jun 11 '13 at 13:46
    
This is actually not how I intended it, I meant using ebx and then not restoring it, you don't have to restore it printf itself has to restore ebx. –  harold Jun 11 '13 at 13:47
    
@AmitSinghTomar, Yes, I know. I didn't know about that something like this callee save convention existed. –  Devolus Jun 11 '13 at 13:47

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