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Hi I would like to know how can I override method function if my method is declared like this:

(function ($) {
    $.extend({
        tablesorter: new
        function () {
            function buildHeaders(table) {
                console.log('ORIGINAL HEADERS');
            }

            this.construct = function (settings) {
                return this.each(function () {
                    $headers = buildHeaders(this);
                });
            }
        }
    });

    $.fn.extend({
        tablesorter: $.tablesorter.construct
    });
})(jQuery);

My goal is to completely rewrite tablesorter buildHeaders function.

(function ($) {
    var originalMethod = $.fn.tablesorter;
    $.fn.tablesorter = function() {
        console.log('overiding');

        function buildHeaders(table) {
            console.log('OVERRIDE HEADERS');
        }
        originalMethod.apply(this, arguments);
    }
})(jQuery);

This doesn't work... Any help would be great. Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted
+100

Short Answer: No you can't.

Functions inside functions (i.e. buildHeaders is a function inside another function) are private and cannot be overridden. Take this simple example and guess the output:

// A very simple function inside a function
test = function() {
  function buildHeaders() {
    alert("original buildHeaders called");
  }

  buildHeaders();
}

// Now lets take a backup of the "test" function
oldTest = test;

// And try to override a private function
test = function() {
  function buildHeaders() {
    alert("duplicate buildHeaders called");
  }

  oldTest.apply(this, arguments);
}

// Call
test();

Guess the output?

Why?

I think you're trying this out from a Java (or similar) background, where you override actual methods. In Javascript, you don't override functions, you replace them. i.e.

function x() { }    // Original function
oldX = x            // Original function is now oldX
x = function() { }  // x is now a **NEW** function
                    // we did not override, we replaced

// At this point, oldX and x are two different functions
// You just swapped their names, but x is no longer the original x

This part is clear. Now on to the second part, Private/Local Variables:

function x() {
  var y = 0;
}
x();
alert(y); // No, you cannot access "y" from outside

But let's take:

function x() {
  y = 0;  // Without "var"
}
x();
alert(y); // Alerts "0"!!

If you give var y = 0 it becomes private inside that function. If you don't, it becomes global scoped (technically upper scoped, but let's leave that out for now).

Third part, functions inside functions are private by default. Going by that same example,

function x() {
  function y() { }
  // this is the same as saying:
  var y = function() { }
  // note "var y", so you can't override this from outside
}

So if you normally define a function inside a function, like function x() { function y() { } }, then y is private to x. Couple this with you can never override a function in javascript, you can only replace. So you will never be able to access or modify that y, except from within the original x function.

Only Alternative

You can replace a function with your custom implementation only if you have access to it. So you have to either edit the original function, or somehow you have to save a reference to buildHeaders outside the function. i.e. you have to do one of these:

// ...
tablesorter: new function() {
  this.buildHeaders = function() { }
  // ...
}

// and later, you can replace this:
tablesorter.buildHeaders = function() { // alternative code }

You will be able to override the function because its not private, and you have a handle to access it.

Edit: Minor grammar

share|improve this answer
    
Nice Explanations.. :) –  MarmiK Jun 21 '13 at 10:04
    
This won't work for his code because $headers = buildHeaders(this); cannot find the buildHeaders function anymore. Remember that this refers to jquery object, not tablesorter anymore. –  Khanh TO Jun 23 '13 at 3:47
    
If the OP changes buildHeaders into an object function, instead of the current function inside function, then yes - they have to update other parts of the code. Hence the overall answer is No you can't, the current code isn't designed to support overriding, and any change will require slight changes to the existing code, which kind of defeats the OP's goal of overriding things without patching existing code. Hence the answer No you can't –  RDX Jun 23 '13 at 13:11
    
Great explanation. –  reagan Jun 23 '13 at 14:16

$.extend is not the correct way to extend jQuery, but a jQuery utility method. You should use $.fn.extend. Then it should work. If not try also to use

(function ($) {
  var originalMethod = $.fn.tablesorter;
  $.fn.extend({
    tablesorter: function() {
      console.log('overiding');

      function buildHeaders(table) {
        console.log('OVERRIDE HEADERS');
      }
      originalMethod.apply(this, arguments);
    }
  })
})(jQuery);

You can read more here: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.fn.extend/

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

There are some ways to do it:

  • Do it like RDX's answer: storing a reference to buildHeaders and replacing it completely (remember to store the context as this in your construct function refers to the jquery object, not the tablesorter).
  • Why not take a simpler way: just modify your original function in your first block of code. I guess the reason you don't do it is because you don't want to lose the original function, otherwise you could take this simple approach instead of the first approach.

if that's the case, here I propose another approach based on template method design pattern. This approach allows you to override completely part of a template method without losing the original function.

(function ($) {
    $.extend({
        tablesorter: new
        function () {
            var self = this; //preserve the context
            this.buildHeaders = function (table) {
               //you can customize the template method anyway you want
               this.buildHeadersCore(table);
            }

            this.buildHeadersCore = function (table){
                console.log('ORIGINAL HEADERS');
            }

            this.construct = function (settings) {
                return this.each(function () {
                    $headers = self.buildHeaders(this);//call via "self" instead of "this" because "this" now refers to jquery object, not the tablesorter anymore
                });
            }
        }
    });

    $.fn.extend({
        tablesorter: $.tablesorter.construct
    });
})(jQuery);

function inherit(proto) {
    var F = function() { };
    F.prototype = proto;
    return new F();
}

(function ($) {
    var tablesorterExtended = inherit($.tablesorter);
    tablesorterExtended.buildHeadersCore = function (table){
         console.log('OVERRIDE HEADERS');
    }
    $.fn.tablesorterExtended = tablesorterExtended.construct;
   //or you can even use your old name. The point is the original buildHeaders function is not lost when you replace.
   //$.fn.tablesorter = tablesorterExtended.construct;
})(jQuery);
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