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I am not happy with the accepted answer to Append an object to a list in R in amortized constant time?

> list1 <- list("foo", pi)
> bar <- list("A", "B")

How can I append new element bar to list1? Clearly, c() does not work, it flattens bar:

> c(list1, bar)
[[1]]
[1] "foo"

[[2]]
[1] 3.141593

[[3]]
[1] "A"

[[4]]
[1] "B"

Assignment to index works:

> list1[[length(list1)+1]] <- bar
> list1
[[1]]
[1] "foo"

[[2]]
[1] 3.141593

[[3]]
[[3]][[1]]
[1] "A"

[[3]][[2]]
[1] "B"

What is the efficiency of this method? Is there a more elegant way?

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9  
c(list1,list(bar))? Please use package microbenchmark to benchmark this yourself. –  Roland Jun 11 '13 at 14:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Adding elements to a list is very slow when doing it one element at a time. See these two examples:

I'm keeping the Result variable in the global environment to avoid copies to evaluation frames and telling R where to look for it with .GlobalEnv$, to avoid a blind search with <<-:

Result <- list()

AddItemNaive <- function(item)
{
    .GlobalEnv$Result[[length(.GlobalEnv$Result)+1]] <- item
}

system.time(for(i in seq_len(2e4)) AddItemNaive(i))
#   user  system elapsed 
#  15.60    0.00   15.61 

Slow. Now let's try the second approach:

Result <- list()

AddItemNaive2 <- function(item)
{
    .GlobalEnv$Result <- c(.GlobalEnv$Result, item)
}

system.time(for(i in seq_len(2e4)) AddItemNaive2(i))
#   user  system elapsed 
#  13.85    0.00   13.89

Still slow.

Now let's try using an environment, and creating new variables within this environment instead of adding elements to a list. The issue here is that variables must be named, so I'll use the counter as a string to name each item "slot":

Counter <- 0
Result <- new.env()

AddItemEnvir <- function(item)
{
    .GlobalEnv$Counter <- .GlobalEnv$Counter + 1

    .GlobalEnv$Result[[as.character(.GlobalEnv$Counter)]] <- item
}

system.time(for(i in seq_len(2e4)) AddItemEnvir(i))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.36    0.00    0.38 

Whoa much faster. :-) It may be a little awkward to work with, but it works.

A final approach uses a list, but instead of augmenting its size one element at a time, it doubles the size each time the list is full. The list size is also kept in a dedicated variable, to avoid any slowdown using length:

Counter <- 0
Result <- list(NULL)
Size <- 1

AddItemDoubling <- function(item)
{
    if( .GlobalEnv$Counter == .GlobalEnv$Size )
    {
        length(.GlobalEnv$Result) <- .GlobalEnv$Size <- .GlobalEnv$Size * 2
    }

    .GlobalEnv$Counter <- .GlobalEnv$Counter + 1

    .GlobalEnv$Result[[.GlobalEnv$Counter]] <- item
}

system.time(for(i in seq_len(2e4)) AddItemDoubling(i))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   0.22    0.00    0.22

It's even faster. And as easy to a work as any list.

Let's try these last two solutions with more iterations:

Counter <- 0
Result <- new.env()

system.time(for(i in seq_len(1e5)) AddItemEnvir(i))
#   user  system elapsed 
#  27.72    0.06   27.83 


Counter <- 0
Result <- list(NULL)
Size <- 1

system.time(for(i in seq_len(1e5)) AddItemDoubling(i))
#   user  system elapsed 
#   9.26    0.00    9.32

Well, the last one is definetely the way to go.

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I tried the first approach with [[]] with different number of elements: 2e3 runs 100x faster than 2e4, clearly O(N^2), so the whole list is being copied. On the other hand, assigning to different variable name each time takes about 20x time for 2e5 elements compared to 2e4 elements, which is O(N) -- performance that what I would expect from adding an element to a list. –  user443854 Jun 11 '13 at 17:39

It's very easy. You just need to add it in the following way :

list1$bar <- bar
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