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How can I substitue an element in an array?

a = [1,2,3,4,5]

I need to replace 5 with [11,22,33,44].flatten!

so that a now becomes

a = [1,2,3,4,11,22,33,44]
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please give us an explanation as to why you are needing to do this and in what context this is –  Earlz Nov 10 '09 at 0:06
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8 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Not sure if you're looking to substitute a particular value or not, but this works:

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
b = [11, 22, 33, 44]
a.map! { |x| x == 5 ? b : x }.flatten!

This iterates over the values of a, and when it finds a value of 5, it replaces that value with array b, then flattens the arrays into one array.

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While this does work, it's overly complicated for what the original poster is trying to do. Using array-slicing to replace a range is a more straight-forward and simple solution. See this answer. –  Cupcake Mar 27 at 8:08
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Perhaps you mean:

a[4] = [11,22,33,44] # or a[-1] = ...
a.flatten!

A functional solution might be nicer, how about just:

a[0..-2] + [11, 22, 33, 44]

which yields...

=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 11, 22, 33, 44]
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+1 nice!!! only a small correction, on the first line it's a[4] not a[5] –  alfasin Apr 14 '13 at 9:20
    
Roger, fixed... –  DigitalRoss Apr 14 '13 at 10:22
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+1 Thanks! The functional solution was more adaptable to when I wanted to replace a single element by two values at a variable location in the array, i.e.: a[0..b-1] + [val1, val2] + [b+1..-1] –  mm2001 Jan 29 at 5:42
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You really don't have to flatten if you just concatenate. So trim the last element off the first array and concatenate them:

a = [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ]           #=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
t = [11, 22, 33, 44]            #=> [11, 22, 33, 44]
result = a[0..-2] + t           #=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 11, 22, 33, 44]

a[0..-2] is a slice operation that takes all but the last element of the array.

Hope it helps!

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The version of bta using a.index(5) is the fastest one:

a[a.index(5)] = b if a.index(5) # 5.133327 sec/10^6

At least 10% faster than Ryan McGeary's one:

a.map!{ |x| x == 5 ? b : x } # 5.647182 sec/10^6

However, note that a.index(5) only return the first index where 5 is found. So, given an array where 5 appears more than once, results will be different:

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5]
b = [11,22,33,44]

a[a.index(5)] = b if a.index(5)
a.flatten # => [1, 2, 3, 4, 11, 22, 33, 44, 5]

a.map!{ |x| x == 5 ? b : x }
a.flatten # => [1, 2, 3, 4, 11, 22, 33, 44, 11, 22, 33, 44]
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This variant will find the 5 no matter where in the array it is.

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
a[a.index(5)]=[11, 22, 33, 44] if a.index(5)
a.flatten!
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Array#delete will return the item or nil. You may use this to know whether or not to push your new values

a.push 11,22,33,44 if a.delete 5
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gweg, not sure what you're trying to do here, but are you looking for something like this?

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
a.delete_at(4)
a = a.concat([11,22,33,44])

There are a number of ways of doing this -- I don't think the code above is especially nice looking. It all depends on the significance of '5' in your original array.

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Here is another simple way to replace the value 5 in the array:

a[-1, 1] = [11, 22, 33, 44]

This uses the Array#[]= method. I'm not exactly sure why it works though.

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