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So I'm relatively new to the more interesting parts of git besides push, pull, commit, and branches. I was looking at the android subreddit and found a link to the source of a new feature for the Paranoid Android rom. When I looked at it, I noticed that the ENTIRE feature was a single set of 2 individual commits pushed to 2 repos (Part 1, Part 2). In the comment section of the post, people mentioned how people can add this feature to their rom by merging the commit. This makes sense to me since all the changes to add that feature are added in that single commit.

What I don't understand though is how someone could easily merge that feature if it was updated a bunch of times. Now we have a single "base" commit to merge along with a ton of other, smaller "update commits". I don't see any branches from the main project on the github page, so there isn't really a central "This is where this feature was added" place. So if I at first decide to not add the feature to my ROM, the feature is updated in multiple commits, how would I merge it with my project?

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When you merge a commit into your project, that also merges in all of its ancestors. So merging in a subsequent commit built on the original patch will also pull in the original patch.

It's possible to use a commit (rather than a branch) as the argument to git merge, but also it is easy to create a branch pointing to that commit. So for example someone could easily create a MY_ENTIRE branch in their repository for their follow-up commit; merge branch MY_ENTIRE and you'll also pull in the original commit.

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