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Is anyone aware of a library/API/service/PHP code that allows users to email each other without revealing their email addresses? It seems like such a common need that it'd be a shame to roll my own.

Usage scenario:
1)  User A posts public-facing content on our site.
2)  User B wants to talk to User A privately.  He is able to click on User A's name and launch an email to "mywebsite-userid123456@relayservice.com".
3)  When User B sends the email, the email goes to mywebsite-userid123456@relayservice.com, which then calls our server to find out who userid 123456 is, and then relays the email.  Likewise, any replies are masked.  (Though this can be optional)

Any such animal?

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it existed, and it was shutdown. anon.penet.fi. The privacy was wonderful; the rampant abuse to send things like kiddy porn, not so much. –  Marc B Jun 11 '13 at 16:54
    
Interesting... thanks for the lead. I read their background and I think there is one main difference; they masked the sender and allowed you to email anyone. The usage scenario above would only allow targeting of people within the same network, and the recipient has to reveal themself. So I can't send an anonymous email to barrack.obama@whitehouse.gov, but barrack.obama@whitehouse.gov could allow people to contact him without revealing his address. So it's a bit different. –  Anthony Jun 11 '13 at 17:00

2 Answers 2

You could try to use the functionality out of something like Osclass:

'http://osclass.org/'

OR:

You're going to need to make sure you have a legitimate mail server setup. You can use any email@yourdomain.com that you chose, which means translating emails into masks is simple matter of coding in your favorite language the following:

Less Secure Way 1:

    //Make sure the user is logged in or prompt to do so
    if(user.LoggedIn())
    {
        mail.send(form.ToField, user.StoredUniqueId, form.subject, form.content);
    }
    else
    {
        Forward to user login page;
    }

More Secure:

    //Make sure the user is logged in or prompt to do so
    if(user.LoggedIn())
    {
        //Create a unique entry into a database for reverse lookup
        string uniqueEmailID = CreateUniqueEmail(user.EmailAddress);
        DbConnection.AddEntry(uniqueEmailID, user.EmailAddress, Date.Now);
        mail.send(form.ToField, uniqueEmailID, form.subject, form.content);
    }
    else
    {
        Forward to user login page;
    }

On the first format, if you convert the user's email address into a unique email address, somebody may be able to reverse engineer your conversion function and obtain people's actual emails.

If you use a random generator and store that email, a third party could collect the emails and store them for spamming as they would never change.

On the second, more secure format, your emails will come from a different email every time, not allowing for user's temp email address to be stored or reused but you would have to write some code if you want for users to be able to reply to these addresses. The site would have to be able to translate them back into their actual user accounts. You could utilize GUID formatted emails @yourdomain.com (adding some additional text if you desire and/or stripping out the dashes). After a set number of days, you could delete the unique email address from the reverse lookup table and deny any emails from that are not in the table, essentially rejecting anything that wasn't "Reply To"ed by a user that received the email. To learn more about GUID, look here:

'http://www.guidgenerator.com/'

I hope this helps.

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Yep, that makes perfect sense. I guess I was hoping that someone already created a service for project for it, rather than having to build it from scratch. –  Anthony Jun 11 '13 at 17:58
    
If you have a mail server running at your company, than sending the email is super easy, just add an entry to your database for the future lookup and send the email with your custom 'from' email that you created. This is only a few lines of code. The slightly longer part would be to write a server that reads your mail server's mail store, does the lookup, translates the email to field, then puts it in which ever folder your webpage looksup messages. You could probably do it in a day with good Google skills. You essentially do "Find file, modify file, move file". Not a hard service. –  Cyphryx Jun 11 '13 at 23:36
    
Hmm.. I somewhat get what you're saying. We actually use SendGrid for our delivery, so I never bothered to install a mail server. Would you recommend using Postfix / Sendmail? It sounds like whatever is chosen should ideally write inbound mail to a directory and read outbound mail from a directory? –  Anthony Jun 12 '13 at 19:16
    
Update: It looks like Postfix keeps inbound mail in user specific directories, and outbound mail in a /spool directory. (unix.stackexchange.com/questions/23277/…) So maybe it's just a matter of reading the inbound mail, editing the to/from address with a regex, and moving the email to the /spool directory. If it's magically that easy... :) Thoughts? –  Anthony Jun 12 '13 at 19:21
    
Sorry for the delay Anthony. How your mail server sends is irrelevant, as you'll generate and log the from address prior to executing client.Send(msg). The fun comes when processing the message store. Often, people have spam/antivirus/malware scanners watch these folders and delete bad email. Your job to make this all work would be to do exactly as you stated and grab mail in the mailstore, change the to field back to the internal address for your users using the table you generated, and then requeue the message. Here's a link talking about it for Postfix: (goo.gl/hsISm) –  Cyphryx Jun 19 '13 at 0:14

I imagine most of the time it's handled simply by giving the users their own email address on your server. Email addresses are effectively anonymous anyway, unless you provide identification information. So run a mail server, give them the address "youraddress@myserver.com", and store their real email address; then any replies get autoforwarded to their real email. Lots of vanity email addresses work this way.

That would allow effective privacy, since the replying user wouldn't know who was really on the other end, as long as the other user didn't want to reveal himself/herself, and was careful with replies (sending them through your webform rather than their own email client).

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That's true too. That would still expose the sender's email address, however, unless the sender went through a web form. I suppose we could parse the inbound email, swap the sender's email with their "youraddress@myserver.com" email, and then relay it to the recipient. Either way, that's a fair amount of coding, plus dealing with delivery issues, etc. Was hoping it'd be a half-day project. Sounding like a pain in the butt. :) –  Anthony Jun 11 '13 at 18:13

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