Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a multi module project that uses war overlays and we have a continuous integration server that often deploys the snapshots. I have questions like, if I do a mvn compile right after the CI server does a deploy of it, will my build get my local changes or the CI changes? How do I force my project to use a war overlay I've changed locally? I figure an install could do that, but what if the CI server builds a version with a newer timestamp. Which one will it use?

This is just a few of the many questions I have and I can't find an authoritative answer on the maven documentation. But, even if I could I'd probably come right back here and ask someone to explain the documentation better :P So, I ask, what is the order/logic maven uses to find it's dependencies?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As far as Maven concerns, the artifact generated from your war overlays will just be yet another artifact.

if I do a mvn compile right after the CI server does a deploy of it, will my build get my local changes or the CI changes?

This will be depending on your snapshots updatePolicy in your settings file. It is by default set to daily. More details here: http://maven.apache.org/settings.html#Repositories

How do I force my project to use a war overlay I've changed locally?

Change the snapshots updatePolicy to never (or -o option, suggested by @matsev). This means the SNAPSHOT dependencies that you are using will always be the local version. To force grab the latest from the repository one with this updatePolicy, use the -U option.

I figure an install could do that, but what if the CI server builds a version with a newer timestamp. Which one will it use?

Yes, install will basically deploy your artifact to your local repository (.m2 folder). Then, depending on the updatePolicy, maven will compare the locally deployed artifact and the repository artifact. If updatePolicy is set to always, maven will always grab the repository one if it has a newer timestamp. The same goes to daily, except that maven will only compare the timestamp daily.

I can't find an authoritative answer on the maven documentation.

Totally agree. Sadly, I understand most of these partly through experience.

share|improve this answer
    
Just to be clear, you're saying that I'll get the module from the CI server instead of my local environment if the updatePolicy is always and the CI has a newer version? Just want to make sure that modules act the same way as dependencies in this way. Because if maven always used the local version of modules, that's probably be better behavior. –  tieTYT Jun 12 '13 at 18:41
    
Please answer that question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/17073441/… Thanks –  tieTYT Jun 12 '13 at 19:16

You can use the -o (--offline) option to force Maven to use your local files, e.g.

mvn -o clean install 

See Maven Command Line Options for reference (or simply execute mvn -h).

share|improve this answer
    
That is helpful information and I'll probably use that in the future. But it's not a direct answer to my question. –  tieTYT Jun 11 '13 at 19:06

e know that a project's dependencies are declared in pom.xml. Apache Maven uses concept of repository to hold JAR files. There are two kinds of repository, local repository and remote repository. You can define this in settings.xml on maven/conf directory or pom.xml itself. When we kick off Maven build process by executing mvn install command, it first search for dependency JAR in local repository, if it found there it uses, otherwise it goes to remote repository to download corresponding version of JAR file and stores into local repo as well. There is one more thing, which is worth remember is type of dependency. If you have included a SNAPSHOT JAR e.g. 1.2-SNAPSOT as part of your dependency, opposite to regular stable version 1.2

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.