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In writing a method to compare 2 words, how can I check to see if the words are only 1 letter different? I'm assuming words are same length and order of letters doesnt matter (see "cobra","bravo").

def one_letter_apart?(word1, word2)

I expect the results below:

one_letter_apart?("abra","abro") == true
one_letter_apart?("cobra","bravo") == true
one_letter_apart?("bravo","tabby") == false
one_letter_apart?("abc","cab") == false

I have tried a few ways of manipulating them (splitting,sorting,then setting equal and adding to new array, then counting), but none so far have worked. Any ideas are greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
I am not quite sure what do you mean in your second question. Can you please give example? – Ivaylo Strandjev Jun 11 '13 at 17:56
    
What about like "abc" and "cab", the "c" moves from the end to the beginning. Is that one letter different or not? Requirements are generally unclear to me. – Joshua Cheek Jun 11 '13 at 17:59
    
hi josh, for "abc" and "cab", they wouldn't be one letter different for the question I am thinking about. The order doesn't matter. – JaTo Jun 11 '13 at 18:04
    
    
Your question has been heavily edited for clarity and syntax. In addition, please only ask one question per question. Thanks! – CodeGnome Jun 11 '13 at 18:12
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This one makes use of the fact that String#sub substitutes only the first thing it finds.

def one_different_char?(str, other)
  other_str = other.dup
  str.chars{|char| other_str.sub!(char, '')} #sub! just replaces just one occurence of char
  other_str.size == 1
end


test_set = [["abra","abro"],["cobra","bravo"],["bravo","tabby"],["abc","cab"]]
test_set.each{|first, second| puts one_different_char?(first, second) }

#true
#true
#false
#false
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! This is essentially the same algorithm as mine, but shorter and cleaner because that's a simpler way to remove the first occurrence. – Darshan Rivka Whittle Jun 11 '13 at 19:00
    
It breaks if other happens to be the same as str with on letter appended, e.g. one_different_char?('abc', 'abcd'). You'll have to check for the lengths being equal to get around this. (This is assuming I understand the requirements correctly.) – Darshan Rivka Whittle Jun 11 '13 at 19:02
1  
@DarshanComputing Read the question carefully. – sawa Jun 11 '13 at 19:05
    
@sawa I read it carefully, I'm just not clear on whether "I'm assuming words are same length and order of letters doesn't matter" means "the method can assume its inputs are the same length" or "the method must ensure that its inputs are the same length". Maybe it's just me seeing ambiguity when it isn't there, something we're all prone to with natural language. – Darshan Rivka Whittle Jun 11 '13 at 19:12
    
Great answer! Thanks – JaTo Jun 11 '13 at 19:24

Check Levenshtein Distance

You want the Levenstein distance. For example, using the text gem:

require 'text'

def one_letter_apart? string1, string2
 Text::Levenshtein.distance(string1, string2) == 1 ? true : false
end

one_letter_apart? "abra", "abro"
# => true 
one_letter_apart? "cobra", "bravo"
# => false 
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a different way of doing this so that "cobra" and "bravo" would return true as the "c" and the "v" are the only letter different? Thanks – JaTo Jun 11 '13 at 18:16
1  
The ` ? true : false` part is totally unneeded. – Sergey Bolgov Jun 11 '13 at 18:16
2  
The question has cobra and bravo being one letter apart. If I understand the question right you could fix this by sorting the strings before computing edit distance. – Frederick Cheung Jun 11 '13 at 18:16
    
@Frederick Cheung, the splitted/sorted version would reuslt in ["a","b","o","r","v"] and ["a","b","c","o","r"]. – JaTo Jun 11 '13 at 18:19
    
@SergeyBolgov It's not idiomatic; it's there to make the comparison and the results explicit for the OP. Feel free to return the comparison directly if you prefer. – CodeGnome Jun 11 '13 at 18:20
def one_letter_apart?(s1, s2)
  return false if s1.length != s2.length

  a2 = s2.chars.to_a
  s1.chars.each do |c|
    if i = a2.index(c)
      a2.delete_at(i)
    end
  end

  a2.length == 1
end

one_letter_apart?("abra","abro") == true
# => true
one_letter_apart?("cobra","bravo") == true
# => true
one_letter_apart?("bravo","tabby") == false
# => true
one_letter_apart?("abc","cab") == false
# => true

Update: To answer your question of how it works: This is the exact same general algorithm as steenslag's, but I didn't think of using String#sub! to do the removal, so I converted to arrays and used a combination of index and delete_at to remove the first occurrence of the given character. The naïve approach is a2.delete_at(a2.index(c)), but if the character c doesn't exist in a2, then index returns nil, which is an invalid input for delete_at. The workaround is to only call delete_at if index returns something non-nil, which is what I've done. i is declared and set to a2.index(c), and the value of that assignment is evaluated by if. It's the same as:

i = a2.index(c)
if i
  # ...

I much prefer steenslag's approach and would have done the exact same thing if I'd thought of String#sub!.

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer as well! Thanks – JaTo Jun 11 '13 at 19:29
    
I am having trouble understanding where/how your variable i is declared? Would greatly appreciate if you could explain this. – JaTo Jun 11 '13 at 20:05
    
@JamieS My explanation is too long for a comment; I've added it as an update to my answer. – Darshan Rivka Whittle Jun 11 '13 at 21:44
    
Thank you for your explanation!! – JaTo Jun 11 '13 at 22:27

This function returns true if two strings have equal lengths and only one different letter while all the other letters are in the same positions:

def one_letter_apart? string1, string2
  return false if string1.size != string2.size
  found = false
  (0...string1.size).each do |i|
    next if string1[i] == string1[i]
    return false if found  # if found is already true, and we found another difference, then result is false.
    found = true  # We found the first difference.
  end
  found  # True if only one difference was found.
end

This function handles letters in wrong positions (like "cobra" and "bravo") as well:

def one_letter_apart? string1, string2
  letters1 = string1.chars.each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) { |c, h| h[c] += 1 }
  letters2 = string2.chars.each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) { |c, h| h[c] -= 1 }
  diff = letters1.merge(letters2) { |key, count1, count2| count1 + count2 }
  return diff.values.select { |v| v != 0 } .sort == [-1, 1]
end
share|improve this answer
    
This is clean and great for all situations except situations where the letters are scrambled around. It wouldn't return true for one_letter_apart?("cobra","bravo") – JaTo Jun 11 '13 at 18:32
    
@JamieS added a solution for that case as well. – Sergey Bolgov Jun 11 '13 at 19:01

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