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I've got a TabContainer control which houses several tabs. Depending on the ActiveIndex property of the TabContainer I would like for a button click to create a Gridview in that tab and bind it to a stored procedure. Currently, the following code works, but there's a lot of code repeated

 protected void btnMakeGridView_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            string cs = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["dbcs"].ConnectionString;
            if (TabContainer1.ActiveTabIndex == 0)
            {

                using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(cs))
                {
                    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("spTest0", con))
                    {
                        con.Open();
                        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
                        SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();
                        GridView gv = new GridView();
                        TabContainer1.Tabs[TabContainer1.ActiveTabIndex].Controls.Add(gv);
                        gv.DataSource = rdr;
                        gv.DataBind();

                    }
                }
            }
            else if (TabContainer1.ActiveTabIndex == 1)
            {
                using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(cs))
                {
                    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("spTest1", con))
                    {
                        con.Open();
                        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
                        SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();
                        GridView gv = new GridView();
                        TabContainer1.Tabs[TabContainer1.ActiveTabIndex].Controls.Add(gv);
                        gv.DataSource = rdr;
                        gv.DataBind();

                    }
                }
            }
            else if (TabContainer1.ActiveTabIndex == 2)
            {
                using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(cs))
                {
                    using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("spTest2", con))
                    {
                        con.Open();
                        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
                        SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();
                        GridView gv = new GridView();
                        TabContainer1.Tabs[TabContainer1.ActiveTabIndex].Controls.Add(gv);
                        gv.DataSource = rdr;
                        gv.DataBind();

                    }
                }
            }
            else
            {
                Label1.Text = "You must select a tab to create the GridView in";
            }

        }

As you can see depending on the ActiveIndex of the TabContainer, a different stored procedure should be created inside each TabPanel. In my example I'm only working with one database so I don't have to worry about passing the connection string as a parameter for a database to connect to. At first blush I had added something like

 //pass in the connection string, the stored procedure name and the ActiveTabIndex
        public static void DataAccess(string connectionString,string spName, int activeTabIndex)
        {
            using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
            {
                using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(spName, con))
                {
                    con.Open();
                    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
                    SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();
                    GridView gv = new GridView();

                    gv.DataSource = rdr;
                    gv.DataBind();

                }
            }
        }

UDPATE: Okay, in the meantime I came up with

 public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page
    {

        string cs = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["dbcs"].ConnectionString;
        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

        }

        protected void btnMakeGridView_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            TabContainer1.Tabs[TabContainer1.ActiveTabIndex].Controls.Add(GetData(cs, "spTest", TabContainer1.ActiveTabIndex));
        }
        public static GridView GetData(string connectionString,string spName, int activeIndex)
        {
            using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
            {
                using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(spName, con))
                {
                    con.Open();
                    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
                    SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();
                    GridView gv = new GridView();
                    gv.ID = "gv" + activeIndex.ToString();
                    gv.DataSource = rdr;
                    gv.DataBind();
                    return gv;
                }

            }
        }

    }
share|improve this question
1  
You should consider using Entity Framework or something, which will make this much simpler. –  John Saunders Jun 11 '13 at 19:16
    
@JohnSaunders I've have been interested in learning that, but I'm still poking around at more or less learning the basics and I think that might be too advanced for me right now. –  wootscootinboogie Jun 12 '13 at 1:11
    
Entity Framework is not advanced. It's the suggested way to do data access. –  John Saunders Jun 12 '13 at 1:18
    
@JohnSaunders Could you elaborate on that, please? Do you mean de facto standard suggestion for data access these days, or in this particular situation your suggestion? –  wootscootinboogie Jun 12 '13 at 1:19
    
I would say it's the entry-level way of doing data access in .NET these days. Just use "Database-first", create an EDMX file from your database tables, and start coding. It's even simpler than the old "strongly-typed DataSet" feature that used to be in Visual Studio. –  John Saunders Jun 12 '13 at 1:20

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