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I'm running a bunch of Get monads with runGetState at various points in my code. They run on a lazy ByteString returned by readFile. There's a main function that calls a bunch of very short functions, each of which does a little reading.

When I run main in GHCI, I get the following:

<interactive>: too few bytes. Failed reading at byte position 1

That's all the information it provides. I have two questions:

  1. Is there any way to obtain more debugging information from this error? Can I determine which particular invocation of runGetState failed? A line number would be very helpful. Any other debugging info I could get?

  2. Any thoughts on why it might have failed at byte position 1? Is that zero-based? I.e. did it successfully read byte 0 but fail on 1, or did it fail on the first byte? For what it's worth, I can do print theLazyByteString, and it does print 33026, which is what I expected. So the file is not empty and appears to have been successfully opened for reading. My assumption is that "byte position 1" doesn't actually refer to a point early in the file itself, but the beginning of a runGetState invocation later on.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

too few bytes. Failed reading at byte position

Is the error you get (in binary < 0.6) when getBytes was called with an argument larger than the remaining input, or getLazyByteStringNul was called when the remaining input doesn't contain a 0 byte. Or when some client code calls fail "too few bytes".

Is there any way to obtain more debugging information from this error?

No, that's all you can get from that error, it doesn't know more than that.

Can I determine which particular invocation of runGetState failed? A line number would be very helpful. Any other debugging info I could get?

That is possible. You can use the ghci debugger (set breakpoints on the candidates and step through them), or you can insert some trace calls (import Debug.Trace) at strategic points in the source to see where you are.

Any thoughts on why it might have failed at byte position 1? Is that zero-based? I.e. did it successfully read byte 0 but fail on 1, or did it fail on the first byte?

It's zero-based (the number is the number of bytes read before). As to why it failed, I can't tell without seeing the source and the input.

My assumption is that "byte position 1" doesn't actually refer to a point early in the file itself, but the beginning of a runGetState invocation later on.

Not unlikely. That depends on what offset argument you pass to the runGetState calls.

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Thanks! Does the error message take into account the offset given to runGetState? E.g. if I call runGetState with an offset of 32, and I get an error at byte 0, does that mean it was the 32nd byte in ByteString that failed? –  Jarrett Jun 11 '13 at 20:01
    
To answer my own question about the offset: It appears that the error does not print the true position in the ByteString, but rather the position within that invocation of runGetState. So with an offset of 32 and an error at byte 0, the error is actually at the 32nd byte of the total ByteString. –  Jarrett Jun 11 '13 at 20:07
    
With the offset, you tell Get how many bytes have been read so far, so if you pass 32 to runGetState, you'll never get a position smaller than 32, you get 32 + what_was_read_this_time. –  Daniel Fischer Jun 11 '13 at 20:08

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