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I want to make "somehow" the following work:

public class GenericsTest<T> where T: ISomeInterface
{
    private List<T> someList = new List<T>();

    public List<ISomeInterface> GetList()
    {
        return someList; //of course this doesn't even compile
    }
}

Is there a way to do this (like the wildcards in Java) and I just missed it? Or it just can't be done?

EDIT: First of all thank you all for the interest and your answers/comments. Second, sure there are ways to do that, and probably the simplest and most performance effective (not sure for that though) is to create a new list of the proper type and iteratively add the elements of the other list (someList in our case). Question is with all those new variance things, the "ins" and the "outs" if there is a way to do it the "generics way". In Java that could be:

public class GenericsTest<T extends SomeInterface> {
    private List<T> someList = new ArrayList<>();

    public List<? extends SomeInterface> getList() {
        return someList;
    }
}

So I was wandering if there is the ? extends equivalent in C#. I could accept a "no" as a short answer, I just thought I should ask first.

EDIT 2: Some users believe and some others insist that this is a duplicate of a question that has to do with casting. Since I marked the most suitable for me answer, for the sake of clarity I explain. Guys, I don't want to cast. I am simply looking for an equivalent of the Java wildcard with the extends constraint. Of course Java has compile time only generics, which might make the difference. If the equivalent in C# is done with casting fine, but I am aware of the problem of "having a Dog object in Cat list", so my question is different.

share|improve this question
    
This kind of goes into variance. You could probably return it as an IEnumerable<ISomeInterface> though. EDIT: The key issue is that if you return your List<T> as List<ISomeInterface>, then callers could call GetList().Add(SomethingThatIsNotTButStillISomeInterface) which is a bad thing. EDIT: You can always return a new copy of the list though that's typed as a List<ISomeInterface> (see below answers) –  Chris Sinclair Jun 11 '13 at 19:13
1  
Do you want to be able to modify the returned list? Should the changes be reflected in the original list? –  svick Jun 11 '13 at 19:21
    
@Chris Sinclair I tried substituting List<ISomeInterface> with IEnumerable<ISomeInterface> and I get the same error. –  Stelios Adamantidis Jun 11 '13 at 22:39
    
@user414076 Sorry my friend but my question is more specific. –  Stelios Adamantidis Jun 11 '13 at 22:42
    
@svick I don't care if the list is read-only or not. –  Stelios Adamantidis Jun 11 '13 at 22:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In C#, generic variance works differently than in Java. If you want to take advantage of it, you need to work with an interface (or delegate) that's variant. Such interfaces include IEnumerable<T> and IReadOnlyList<T> (new in .Net 4.5), but not IList<T>, because that wouldn't be type-safe.

That means you can do something like this:

public class GenericsTest<T> where T: ISomeInterface
{
    private List<T> someList = new List<T>();

    public IEnumerable<ISomeInterface> GetList()
    {
        return (IEnumerable<ISomeInterface>)someList;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That seems to be working. Funny, I tried something similar yesterday and I was getting casting errors, so I guess I tried something wrong. I will mark this as the correct answer since I was aware of the other solutions plus I've learned of the IReadOnlyList. Thanks. –  Stelios Adamantidis Jun 12 '13 at 8:59

You can use OfType<T>

public class GenericsTest<T> where T : ISomeInterface
{
    private List<T> someList = new List<T>();

    public List<ISomeInterface> GetList()
    {
        return someList.OfType<ISomeInterface>().ToList(); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Except if you modify the returned list, it won't affect the original list. Though it's not clear from the question that that's required, I would expect that from a method that returns List. –  svick Jun 11 '13 at 19:20
5  
.OfType() does not cast. It filters. .Cast<T>() would be a better option. –  Joel Coehoorn Jun 11 '13 at 19:24

I believe this would do the trick:

public List<ISomeInterface> GetList()
{
    return someList.Cast<ISomeInterface>().ToList();
}

You could also do:

public List<ISomeInterface> GetList()
{
    return someList.OfType<ISomeInterface>().ToList(); 
}

The difference is that the first option will do a hard cast, which means that if one of the elements does not implement ISomeInterface an exception will be thrown. The second version will only return instances that implement ISomeInterface and will just skip over instances that don't.

In your example, you can safely use the Cast option as you are guaranteed that all instances implement ISomeInterface.

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2  
How could any of the elements not be an ISomeInterface in this case? –  Chris Sinclair Jun 11 '13 at 19:16
    
@ChrisSinclair They can't in this case, I was just illustrating the different options. –  Erik Schierboom Jun 11 '13 at 19:17

here is the problem. lets pretend that this code would compile:

class foo: ISomeInterface {}

class bar: ISomeInterface {}

GenericsTest<foo> testobject = GenericsTest<foo>();
List<ISomeinterface> alist = testobject.GetList();

Internally testobject really has a list of foo but by allowing us to cast to a List<ISomeinterface> there is no way for a caller to know that bad things are going to happen if we try to insert a bar into the list. This is the reason that it isn't allowed and cant easily be allowed.

The way to solve it is to either:

  1. Use a List<ISomeInterface> internally (if the collection becoming heterogeneous is OK)
  2. Create a copy of the list with the desired type if the list being read only is OK. If you need to able to mutate the list in some cases you can add type safe methods on the GenericTest class to accomplish that.
share|improve this answer

One major weakness in Java and .NET is that there is no distinction made between mutable-type references which are used to encapsulate the identity of a mutable object, from those which are used to encapsulate its state. In particular, if code calls getList and then attempts to modify the returned list, it's not clear whether such an attempt should modify the list which is held by GenericsTest<T>, or whether it should simply modify a copy of the list which was created by the method (leaving the original list alone). It's also unclear whether the list returned by getList should be affected by any future changes which are made to the set of items held by the GenericsList<T>.

If your goal is to allow a caller to have a new list which is populated with the items in the original list, but which it can manipulate as it sees fit, I would suggest that you either use an AsList method or else define an interface

interface ICopyableToNewList<out T> {
    // List<T> ToList(); // Can't be an actual interace member--must use extension method
    int Count {get;}
}

implement a ToList() extension method which acts on that interface:

public static List<T> ToList<T>(this ICopyableToNewList<T> src)

and have your class implement ICopyableToNewList<T>. Such a declaration will allow code to get a new list of any type which is a supertype of T by casting the GenericTest<T> to ICopyableToNewList<desiredType>.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the answer but I've already tried this and it causes a compilation error: Invalid variance: The type parameter 'T' must be invariantly valid on 'GenericsTest.ICopyableToNewList<T>.ToList()'. 'T' is covariant It works with IEnumerable<T> though. –  Stelios Adamantidis Jun 12 '13 at 8:36
    
@SteliosAdamantidis: Hmm... It's possible to use a generic static method for the purpose, and I'd worked out a trick to make things work somewhat more nicely than that. It seems that the system is willing to allow extension methods involving interface types to do things it won't let interfaces themselves do [e.g. the ToList extension method of IEnumerable<T> could not be a proper member of that interface]. –  supercat Jun 12 '13 at 16:07

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