Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have the following C code.

It is supposed to create a house type and a room type. However It seems the room type is not being recognised because I can't create functions of type room.

After the code is the compiler error.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>


//create type Room.
struct Room
{
    float width;
    float length;
    float height;
    char *name;
};

//create type House.
struct House
{
    char *address;
    /*Rooms in house are an array of pointers. Each pointer to a Room.*/
    struct Room *rooms[10];
};

//protype functions.
void printHouse (struct House house);
Room createRoom(char *name, float width, float length, float height);


int main()
{
    //create house h.
    struct House h;
    h.address = "10 Palace Road";
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        h.rooms[i] = NULL;

    //create a room (hall) without use of createRoom. Successful.
    struct Room hall;
    hall.width = 10;
    hall.length = 12;
    hall.height = 9;
    hall.name = "Hall";

    h.rooms[0] = &hall;
    h.rooms[1] = &createRoom("lounge", 20, 20, 9);


    printHouse(h);

    return 0;
}

Room createRoom(char *name, float width, float length, float height)
{
    struct Room r;
    r.width = width;
    r.length = length;
    r.height = height;
    r.name = name;

    return r;
}

//prints contents of the house. Working okay.
void printHouse (struct House house)
{
printf("%s",house.address);
printf("\n\r\n\r");
for (int i=0; i<10; i++)
{
    if (house.rooms[i] != NULL)
    {
        struct Room r = *house.rooms[i];
        printf("Room #%d: %s", i, r.name);
    }
}

}

I am getting the following, that I don't know how to fix, during compile. Could anyone tell me what to do here and tell me why Room is not being recognised as a type?.

gcc -std=c99 -c -Wall -ggdb   -c -o struct.o struct.c
struct.c:24:1: error: unknown type name ‘Room’
struct.c: In function ‘main’:
struct.c:40:15: error: lvalue required as unary ‘&’ operand
struct.c: At top level:
struct.c:49:1: error: unknown type name ‘Room’
struct.c: In function ‘createRoom’:
struct.c:57:2: error: incompatible types when returning type ‘struct Room’ but ‘int’ was expected
struct.c:58:1: warning: control reaches end of non-void function [-Wreturn-type]
make: *** [struct.o] Error 1
share|improve this question
1  
You didn't even post the code in which the first error is present... – user529758 Jun 11 '13 at 20:05
1  
Really? I posted everything apart from my makefile. – urbanslug Jun 11 '13 at 20:11
    
@urbanslug, just so you know, you can initialize a struct in a single declaration (almost like you would initialize an array). – Taylor Flores Jun 11 '13 at 20:15
    
How many bytes would you expect printf("\n\r\n\r"); to print? You might want to check that... – Seb Jun 11 '13 at 20:17

This function:

Room createRoom(char *name, float width, float length, float height);

Should be declared and defined like so:

struct Room createRoom(char *name, float width, float length, float height);
^^^^^^

On this line:

h.rooms[1] = &createRoom("lounge", 20, 20, 9);

you are taking the address of a temporary which you are not allowed to do. You could potentially use a temporary variable like so:

h.rooms[0] = &hall;
struct Room hall2 = createRoom("lounge", 20, 20, 9);
h.rooms[1] = &hall2 ;

although that is not a pretty solution, you may want to consider having createRoom dynamically allocate a Room and return a Room*. You are also assigning string literals to name and address which could come back to bit you later on, you may also want to consider dynamically allocating space for those variables and copying using something like strcpy or strncpy.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried passing the instance of a room like struct Room r; and then h.rooms[1] = &createRoom(r, "lounge", 20, 20, 9); in the function struct Room createRoom(struct Room r, char *name, float width, float length, float height); but it didn't work. A little help. – urbanslug Jun 11 '13 at 20:24
    
Based on how you intend to store them, the function should be struct Room *createRoom(...), and instead of struct Room r;, do struct Room *r=malloc(sizeof struct Room);. Then you can return your pointer to allocated object, and store the pointer in your array of pointers. – This isn't my real name Jun 13 '13 at 19:03

You also can change your declaration from

struct Room
{
    float width;
    float length;
    float height;
    char *name;
};

to

typedef struct Room
{
    float width;
    float length;
    float height;
    char *name;
} Room;

and similar for House.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that helped. – urbanslug Jun 11 '13 at 22:15
    
It's customary to upvote helpful replies here :) – Nathan Henkel Jun 12 '13 at 3:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.