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hey I have this problem that I have been dealing with for the last few day I have a way around it but I know for a fact that it is really bad way to program and I am really hoping someone can suggest a better way to go about this.

I am trying to get a time from an RTC ( real clock timer) I think that is the acronym anyway ,,, Its using a DS 1307 IC ,,,,, every time I start and run the program under constant power it boots fine, but the moment I remove the USB cable for around 10 seconds and then reattach it will give me these funny times.

Something like year 2036 and 46 hours and 165 mins really just garbage. So I read somewhere that these time are just the programs way of saying that there is no connection to the device. That I don't really get because its permanently plugged in but hey thats what it wants.

So here is a basic code that I got from an example that came with the library. I thought because there is no connection just do a while loop until the device gets connection this works well but it takes like sometimes 10 seconds to boot up.

The RTC has a battery backup connected and with lines SCL to A5 and SDA A4

As I say it work but takes really long to boot up and give me the correct time.

// Date and time functions using a DS1307 RTC connected via I2C and Wire lib

#include <Wire.h>
#include "RTClib.h"

RTC_DS1307 RTC;

void setup () {
  Serial.begin(57600);
  Wire.begin();
  RTC.begin();
 Serial.println("RTC capturing time!");
 while (! RTC.isrunning()) 
  {
    Serial.println("RTC is NOT running!");
    Wire.begin();
    RTC.begin();
  }  
Serial.println("RTC IS running!");
// following line sets the RTC to the date & time this sketch was compiled
//  RTC.adjust(DateTime(__DATE__, __TIME__));
}


void loop () {

DateTime now = RTC.now();
Serial.print(now.year(), DEC);
Serial.print('/');
Serial.print(now.month(), DEC);
Serial.print('/');
Serial.print(now.day(), DEC);
Serial.print(' ');
Serial.print(now.hour(), DEC);
Serial.print(':');
Serial.print(now.minute(), DEC);
Serial.print(':');
Serial.print(now.second(), DEC);
Serial.println();

Serial.println();
delay(1000);
}

The output looks like this just with A LOT more RTC is NOT running!

RTC is NOT running!
RTC is NOT running!
RTC is NOT running!
RTC is NOT running!
RTC is NOT running!
RTC is NOT running!
RTC is NOT running!
RTC is NOT running!
RTC is NOT running!
RTC is NOT running!
RTC is NOT running!
RTC IS running!
2013/6/11 22:22:0

2013/6/11 22:22:2

2013/6/11 22:22:3

2013/6/11 22:22:4

2013/6/11 22:22:5

and if I was to not include my while loop idea I get really messed up times and dates as I said before until it for some reason comes right by itself.

Please let me know if anyone knows of a better way to fix my problem I am really confused to why this would be occurring.

share|improve this question
1  
The code at github.com/adafruit/RTClib/blob/master/RTClib.cpp#L164 doesn't check whether any data is available, so if the RTC hasn't started then Wire.read() will return -1. This is converted to 0xff when passed as a uint8_t to bcd2bin, which also doesn't check for erroneous inputs, but just calculates 0xff - 6 * (0xff>>4) which is 255-6*15 => 165. Hence the date time is populated with the 165 and other bad values if the RTC is not ready. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 13 '13 at 13:30

2 Answers 2

Try this code...

void setup () {
  Serial.begin(57600);
  Wire.begin();
  RTC.begin();
  Serial.println("RTC capturing time!");

  while (!RTC.isrunning()) 
  {
    // do not really need this, remove after testing
    Serial.println("RTC is NOT running!");

    delay(10);

  }  
  Serial.println("RTC IS running!");
  // following line sets the RTC to the date & time this sketch was compiled
  //  RTC.adjust(DateTime(__DATE__, __TIME__));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Tried with the delay but no luck hey it just ended up taking longer. –  Spider999 Jun 12 '13 at 7:41
1  
Did you run the code as presented or did you just add the delay(10)? In your original code you had Wire.begin() and RTC.begin() inside the while loop, and so numerous begin were executed. –  user2019047 Jun 12 '13 at 16:45
    
Also, are you sure the clock chip is powered when USB cable is disconnected? And you should set the clock at startup, then have a routine in the loop where you set the clock with the correct time. And please show the code as it is when running. The output does not match the code you have shown. –  user2019047 Jun 12 '13 at 17:23
    
The battery is connected to the RTC module so that it keeps time when the arduino is powered down, so for most applications you don't want to be setting the clock at start-up. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 13 '13 at 13:20
    
@PeteKirkham I agree, but when starting the first time the time is not defined, and over time there is drift which needs adjusting. I use the same clock chip, and I had a set-time call in setup() to get the ballpark time + valid values in the clock. –  user2019047 Jun 14 '13 at 0:24

You should clarify how you power the RTC when USB is disconnected. First you should check if the battery is actually good. Then you need to ensure that the Arduino notices that the RTC was battery powered. This is because the RTC will shut down I2C completely while battery powered --> I2C must be reinitialized when power is recovered. The point is that your DS1307 library might not account for that.

In doubt you need to analyze the source code of your library AND read the datasheet of your DS1307 chip.

Another thing is that the datasheet says

the device switches from battery to VCC when VCC is greater than VBAT+0.2V and recognizes inputs when VCC is greater than 1.25 x VBAT

Did you ever measure VBAT and VCC at startup?

share|improve this answer
    
I have the Battery backup connected at all times and it is good but I had no clue about it stopping I2C after losing power after the main USB power was disconnected. Even with this knowledge doesn't Wire.begin(); and RTC.begin(); start the I2C connection again ? or am I mistaken here ? Is the any chance you know of a library that would have that type of functionality ? I can't be the first person wanting to do this,,, well I hape not :) –  Spider999 Jun 12 '13 at 11:07
    
I just took readings again and I find that the Vbat is sitting at 3.06V and Vcc is at 5.03V. So in fact my problem is with the I2C lines not coming on in time ? but the voltages are in the limits. well I have no clue on how to start with the library thing but what do you think about lowering the Vbat voltage ? by just putting a resistor in series that could make the device switch over faster ? –  Spider999 Jun 12 '13 at 11:58
    
No, you found out that this is probably NOT the cause of the problem. So you have eliminated one of the possible root causes. Did you dig into the source code of the library? –  Udo Klein Jun 12 '13 at 12:37
    
I have not dug into the library because I'm pretty sure that I will mess it up I am sort of new to this but I will have a go at that tomorrow if I can find the time any hints on what I will be looking for ? thanks for all your help so far at least I know the device is functioning correctly for sure now –  Spider999 Jun 12 '13 at 12:45
    
To "dig" == "look into". Reading the code never hurts. And it helps you getting more proficient to read other people's code. So do not be afraid. These libraries are often much simpler than you might expect. –  Udo Klein Jun 12 '13 at 14:35

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