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This one just came up: How do I break out of an if statement? I have a long if statement, but there is one situation where I can break out of it early on.

In a loop I can do this:

while (something ) {
    last if $some_condition;
    blah, blah, blah
    ...
}

However, can I do the same with an if statement?

if ( some_condition ) {
    blah, blah, blah
    last if $some_other_condition; # No need to continue...
    blah, blah, blah
    ...
}

I know I could put the if statement inside a block, and then I can break out of the block:

}
    if ( some_condition ) {
        ...
        last if $some_other_condition; # No need to continue...
        blah, blah, blah
        ...
    }
}

Or, I can create a subroutine (which is probably better programmatically):

if ( some_condition ) {
    run_subroutine();
}

sub run_subroutine {
    blah, blah, blah
    return if $some_other_condition;
    blah, blah, blah
    ...
}

But is there anyway to exit an if condition?


Resolution

The question came up because I was helping someone with their code. Inside a fairly long if statement, there were several other if statements embedded in it. The code looked something like this:

 if ( $condition1 ) {
    blah, blah, blah;
    if ( not $condition2 ) {
       blah, blah, blah;
       if ( not $condition3 ) {
          blah, blah, blah;
       }
    }
}

I thought the whole thing could be made more readable by doing this:

if ( $condition1 ) {
    last if $condition2;
    blah, blah, blah;
    last if $condition3;
    blah, blah, blah;
}

This shows that the normal flow of the if statement is standard, but under certain conditions, the if statement was exited early -- much like using last or next in a while or for loop to exit the loop.

I liked mpapec's solution of using a label -- even if I don't use the label itself. The label is a description of my if:

IF-UNDER-CONDITION1:
{
    if ( $condition1 ) {
        last if $condition2;
        blah, blah, blah;
        last if $condition3;
        blah, blah, blah;
    }
}

Although it isn't a standard coding technique, the flow of the code is obvious enough that a typical low-level Perl developer (the one that has to maintain this code after I leave) could figure out what the code is doing and maintain it. They may even learn something in the process.

share|improve this question
    
Create a "block" inside the if statement and break out of that. –  Floris Velleman Jun 11 '13 at 20:58
4  
The question suggests better program design. if is not meant to break early, if that is needed, you need another program construct (eg function call, another if, a label) or remove the expressions from your if block. –  vol7ron Jun 11 '13 at 21:08
2  
@mpapec right, next and last are really used for iteration control and abused by block-control. if is a logic control and is not designed to exit early. If there's other logic, then you should use other if, or other parts to the language. –  vol7ron Jun 11 '13 at 21:38
1  
@mpapec subroutines are expected to execute one or more statements and return a value. if is logical flow, expected to execute statements - if there are statements that aren't supposed to be executed, then another logic condition should be used. –  vol7ron Jun 11 '13 at 22:00
1  
what's wrong with putting the if inside a block? You can label the block if you're concerned about it looking weird. –  doubleDown Jun 11 '13 at 22:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You can use basic block which is subject to last, next and redo, so there is possible break from it.

if ($condition) {EXIT_IF:{

   last EXIT_IF; # break from code block

   print "never get's executed\n";
}}

EXIT_IF: {
  if ($condition) {

     last EXIT_IF; # break from code block

     print "never get's executed\n";
  }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
You cannot use last to get out of do {}. –  tchrist Jun 11 '13 at 21:38
    
That's an interesting solution. I can't use do, but it works without a do. Looks a wee bit strange in a if/else situation because the if has double {{, but not the else. –  David W. Jun 11 '13 at 21:53
    
@mpapec I've been programming Perl since 3.x, and it never occurred to me before. I was helping someone with their program. They had a long if statement and half way through, they had another condition that if met would stopped executing the last half of the if. I thought it looked ugly, and added too many indents to the code. I was about to suggest using last when I suddenly dawned on me that last doesn't work in if statements. –  David W. Jun 12 '13 at 1:46
    
IMO the last version here is the best given in any answer (only with proper indentation) –  ysth Jun 12 '13 at 14:06
    
@mpapec - I decided to use a variation of your last method. My label is a description of the if statement, and I simply used last. The label doesn't do anything, but acts as a handy description. I'll probably have the whole block rewritten to use a subroutine instead. The if takes up over 40 lines of code which is just too long in my opinion. –  David W. Jun 12 '13 at 19:01

You could put the rest of your if block inside another if statement, like this:

if (some_condition) {
    blah, blah, blah
    if (!$some_other_condition) {
        blah, blah, blah
        ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I know that. You can do the same thing with while and for loops too, but the last and next help clean up the loop logic. –  David W. Jun 11 '13 at 21:46
  • Put it inside an empty for() loop, and add last; everywhere you want to break out AND after the if. A bit ugly but works. Make sure to add comments to explain the trick.

    for (;;) {
        if (condition) { 
            #code
            last if another_condition;
        }
        last;
    }
    
  • use goto and label a statement after your loop for that goto. Be forever damned.

  • Extra block inside the if (e.g. if () {{ code }}). May be hard to read for novices but OK if accompanied by a comment.

  • your own solution: block around if. Not very obvious readability-wise.

  • your own solution: subroutine with return.

    Frankly, unless the cost of calling a sub matters performane wise, this is the cleanest solution as far as readability.

share|improve this answer
2  
you mean just an empty block, not a for (;;), which is an endless loop –  ysth Jun 11 '13 at 21:16
4  
Not a good solution. What happens when I finish my if statement? I end up looping back through my if again. I now have to put another last statement in my if. My OP when I put an empty block is cleaner. –  David W. Jun 11 '13 at 21:49
5  
Using for for no reason is less legible than just adding a {} block somewhere. –  aschepler Jun 11 '13 at 22:20
    
@ysth - I just forgot the last "last" in the code example. Fixed –  DVK Jun 12 '13 at 0:16
1  
@ysth - that was option #4. I listed ALL options I was aware of. –  DVK Jun 12 '13 at 13:28

Another alternative is to use an anonymous subroutine.
Note: I don't recommend this method because of the added scoping complexity (see note below); it is just for completeness of possible answers.

if( $true_condition ){
   (sub{
       return if $true_condition;
       ...
   })->();
}

Note: any variables declared w/in the routine must use our instead of my if you wish to use them in the rest of the code.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't think any nontrivial perl questions can be completely answered. –  aschepler Jun 11 '13 at 22:22
1  
regarding "our vs my" note, same rules would apply as if there is some other code block instead of anon func. –  mpapec Jun 11 '13 at 22:32
    
@mpapec I think you're right –  vol7ron Jun 12 '13 at 15:39

I tend to use sequential if-statements based on a "do I continue?" variable instead. Your

if ( $condition1 ) {
  blah, blah, blah;
  if ( not $condition2 ) {
     blah, blah, blah;
     if ( not $condition3 ) {
        blah, blah, blah;
     }
  }
}

can be rearranged to

my $ok = $condition1;
if ($ok) {
  blah, blah, blah;
  $ok = not $condition2;
}
if ($ok) {
  blah, blah, blah;
  $ok = not $condition3;
}
if ($ok) {
  blah, blah, blah;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's interesting and is simple. My only concern is that the setting of ok depends upon each and every if condition. MY fear is that someone looking over the program will see the first my $ok = ... statement, but miss the others that are embedded in the if statements. –  David W. Nov 13 at 15:06

Keep your while loop so you can use last but also make sure that the loop is executed at most once

my $loop_once = 1;
while ( $loop_once-- and some_condition ) {
    blah, blah, blah
    last if $some_other_condition; # No need to continue...
    blah, blah, blah
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

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