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This question already has an answer here:

I am doing a simple Oracle INSERT and I keep getting this error: [Err] ORA-00984: column not allowed here

INSERT INTO MY.LOGFILE
(id,severity,category,logdate,appendername,message,extrainfo)
VALUES
(
"dee205e29ec34",
"FATAL",
"facade.uploader.model",
"2013-06-11 17:16:31",
"LOGDB",
NULL,
NULL
)
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marked as duplicate by bluefeet, Alex Poole, Shannon Severance, Ben, Rachel Gallen Jun 12 '13 at 8:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
Use single quotes (apostrophes) around string literals e.g. 'FATAL'. Double quotes are optionally (rarely) used around identifiers like column names. – Tony Andrews Jun 11 '13 at 21:36
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Replace double quotes with single ones:

INSERT
INTO    MY.LOGFILE
        (id,severity,category,logdate,appendername,message,extrainfo)
VALUES  (
       'dee205e29ec34',
       'FATAL',
       'facade.uploader.model',
       '2013-06-11 17:16:31',
       'LOGDB',
       NULL,
       NULL
       )

In SQL, double quotes are used to mark identifiers, not string constants.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the error I am getting now. ORA-01861: literal does not match format string – George Murphy Jun 11 '13 at 21:45
    
@GeorgeMurphy: please post your table definition. – Quassnoi Jun 11 '13 at 21:48
1  
That's almost definitely because logdate is a date @George, you're trying to insert a character. You need to convert it to a date using TO_DATE(), see something like stackoverflow.com/questions/10178292/… or stackoverflow.com/questions/11883923/… or hundreds of others... – Ben Jun 11 '13 at 22:29

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