Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following example of the issue. In TypeScript 0.9 I seem to be able to call the final signature of an overloaded method:

class Test {
    method(...names: string[]) : void;
    method(names: string[]) : void {

    }
}

var x= new Test();

x.method('One', 'Two', 'Three');
x.method(['One', 'Two', 'Three']);

In TypeScript 0.8.x you would have to specify a third signature, thus:

class Test {
    method(...names: string[]) : void;
    method(names: string[]) : void;
    method(names: any) : void {

    }
}

var x= new Test();

x.method('One', 'Two', 'Three');
x.method(['One', 'Two', 'Three']);

Shouldn't the final signature be hidden? (Because it is most likely to contain an over-generalised signature with any types etc).

share|improve this question
    
what is the final signature? –  Daniel A. White Jun 11 '13 at 22:03
    
The final signature is the one that has an implementation (i.e. not one that ends with a ;). So in the last example, the final signature is method(names: any) : void { and all the rest are overloaded signatures. –  Steve Fenton Jun 11 '13 at 22:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The 0.8.x behavior is correct; we had a regression in 0.9 that's fixed in the develop branch now. Implementation signatures are indeed never visible.

share|improve this answer
1  
Cracking - thank you. –  Steve Fenton Jun 11 '13 at 23:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.