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I have text file:

/path/to/delete/dir1/dir2/dir3/file1.ext
/path/to/delete/dir1/dir2/dir3/file2.ext
/path/to/delete/dir1/dir2/dir3/file3.ext

I want copy duplicate each string and make some replacements to get this:

dir1/dir2/dir3/file1.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file1.ext
dir1/dir2/dir3/file2.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file2.ext
dir1/dir2/dir3/file3.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file3.ext

I've made script, whitch delete leading path and duplicate string:

sed -e 's/\/path\/to\/delete\///' -e 's/.\+/\0 \0/'  list.txt

Now I've got this:

dir1/dir2/dir3/file1.ext dir1/dir2/dir3/file1.ext
dir1/dir2/dir3/file2.ext dir1/dir2/dir3/file2.ext
dir1/dir2/dir3/file3.ext dir1/dir2/dir3/file3.ext

But a have no idea to replace slashes after space.

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8 Answers

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 's|/path/to/delete/(.*)|\1 \1|;:a;s|/([^ /]*/[^ /]*)$|-\1|;ta' file

Delete require pattern and then duplicate the string.

Work backwards through the second string replacing all but the last / with -.

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Perl solution:

perl -ne 'chomp; s%/path/to/delete/%%; print "$_ "; s%/%-% while 1 < y=/==; print "$_\n";'

It just keeps replacing / with a - while there is enough slashes. It also works separately with the second copy to make the work easier.

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Alternatively, you can use s%/(?=.*/)%-%g to substitute all but the last / without a loop. –  doubleDown Jun 11 '13 at 23:58
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Use the hold space:

sed -e 's%/path/to/delete/%%;h;s%/%-%g;x;G;s/\n/ /'

The h copies the pattern space (the name after the leading path is deleted) to the hold space. Replace the slashes with dashes in the pattern space. Exchange (x) the pattern and hold spaces. Concatenate the hold space after the pattern space with a newline (G). Replace the newline by a space.

That replaces one too many slashes...but the change is 'trivial' if you know about branching in sed too.

sed -e 's%/path/to/delete/%%;h;: redo;s%/\(.*/.*\)%-\1%g;t redo;x;G;s/\n/ /'

The difference is in the presence of : redo which creates a label redo; the t redo which jumps to the label redo if a substitute operation changed anything since the last test; and in the more complex regex which matches a slash (which is not remembered) followed by any material that contains a slash (which is remembered). The unremembered slash is replaced by a dash. It is possible to omit the space after the colon, and also the space after t. I'm not convinced it is good practice to do so. I'd probably also split that up into separate commands to make it easier to understand:

sed -e 's%/path/to/delete/%%' \
    -e 'h' \
    -e ': redo' \
    -e 's%/\(.*/.*\)%-\1%g' \
    -e 't redo' \
    -e 'x' \
    -e 'G' \
    -e 's/\n/ /'

Or:

sed -e 's%/path/to/delete/%%
        h
        : redo
        s%/\(.*/.*\)%-\1%g
        t redo
        x
        G
        s/\n/ /'
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An alternative to the looping part of the solution might be to use greed and replace the last / with a unique character or phrase (perhaps \n), translate all /'s to -'s and then replace the unique character or phrase with a /. –  potong Jun 12 '13 at 8:35
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With awk:

Content of script.awk:

BEGIN {
    FS="/"
}
{
    for (i=5;i<NF;i++) {
        printf "%s/" ,$i
    }
    printf "%s " ,$NF
}
{
    for (i=5;i<NF-1;i++) {
        printf "%s-", $i
    }
    printf "%s/%s\n" ,$(NF-1),$NF
}

Test:

$ cat file
/path/to/delete/dir1/dir2/dir3/file1.ext
/path/to/delete/dir1/dir2/dir3/file2.ext
/path/to/delete/dir1/dir2/dir3/file3.ext
$ awk -f script.awk file
dir1/dir2/dir3/file1.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file1.ext
dir1/dir2/dir3/file2.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file2.ext
dir1/dir2/dir3/file3.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file3.ext

With gawk:

$ gawk '{
    printf ("%s ", gensub(/\/path\/to\/delete\//,"","G",$0)); 
    printf ("%s\n", gensub(/\/(.*)\/(.*)\/(.*)\/(.*)\/(.*)\/(.*)\/(.*)/,"\\4-\\5-\\6\/\\7","G",$0))
}' file

Test:

gawk '{printf ("%s ", gensub(/\/path\/to\/delete\//,"","G",$0)); printf "%s\n", gensub(/\/(.*)\/(.*)\/(.*)\/(.*)\/(.*)\/(.*)\/(.*)/,"\\4-\\5-\\6\/\\7","G",$0) }' file
dir1/dir2/dir3/file1.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file1.ext
dir1/dir2/dir3/file2.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file2.ext
dir1/dir2/dir3/file3.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file3.ext
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I suppose it's a bit of a dirty hack, but it's simple as simple as you can get with sed and should be just enough for your task:

$ sed -r -e 's@/path/to/delete/@@; h; s@(.+)/(.*)@\1\n\2@; s@/@-@g; s@(.+)\n(.+)@\1/\2@; x; G; s/\n/ /' list.txt
dir1/dir2/dir3/file1.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file1.ext
dir1/dir2/dir3/file2.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file2.ext
dir1/dir2/dir3/file3.ext dir1-dir2-dir3/file3.ext
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1  
I'm waiting for potong to see if he/she can outsimple this haha –  doubleDown Jun 12 '13 at 0:01
    
@doubleDown I'm by no means a sed-guru =). If I were to choose a tool, I'd do this in Python. –  kirelagin Jun 12 '13 at 0:04
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Another bash solution

while read path; do
    path=${path#/path/to/delete/}
    file=${path##*/}
    dir=${path%/*}
    printf "%s %s/%s\n" "$path" "${dir//\//-}" "$file"
done < filename
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GNU sed (no jump)

sed -r 's./path/to/delete/..;h;s./([^/]*)$.|\1.;s./.-.g;s.\|./.;x;G;s/\n/ /' file
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Solution with bash only:

Split the path into directory and filename using dirname and basename, change the slashes in the directory path to dashes using tr, then concatenate the result.

➤ for f in "dir1/dir2/dir3/file1.ext" "dir1/dir2/dir3/file1.ext" "dir1/dir2/dir3/file2.ext" "dir1/dir2/dir3/file2.ext"; 
do 
   echo "$(dirname $f | tr '/' '-')/$(basename $f)" ; 
done
dir1-dir2-dir3/file1.ext
dir1-dir2-dir3/file1.ext
dir1-dir2-dir3/file2.ext
dir1-dir2-dir3/file2.ext

Sometime, what you need isn't a hammer.

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Yes, sometimes you need 3 hammers –  doubleDown Jun 12 '13 at 1:12
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