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I am trying recreate the board game "go" in Java. I am currently working on the capturing system. Basically once a stone has been surrounded by the enemy stone on all four sides (diagonal don't count) you remove that stone. Like in the screenshot below.

enter image description here

Or if multiple of the same stones are connected you have to surround all the open sides. Like in the screenshot below.

enter image description here

In both cases the black stones should be removed at this point. This link explains more on the rules of capturing stones. societies.cam. ac. uk /cugos/go/rules_03.html

I was told it would be best to use recursion to do this. After doing some research on recursion I managed to write some code. But it's not working. It only seems to detect the enemy stone on the second move of the game. I call my method every time a stone is placed in my mouseReleased.

public static boolean checkCapture(int x, int y)
{
    {
        if ((board[x][y + 1] != move) && (board[x][y + 1] != 0)) //bellow
        {
            System.out.println("enemy is bellow");
            if (checkCapture(x, y + 1))
                board[x][y] = 0;
        } else if (board[x][y + 1] == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if ((board[x][y - 1] != move) && (board[x][y - 1] != 0)) //above
        {
            System.out.println("enemy is above");
            if (checkCapture(x, y - 1))
                board[x][y] = 0;
        } else if (board[x][y - 1] == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if ((board[x + 1][y] != move) && (board[x + 1][y] != 0)) // right
        {
            System.out.println("enemy is right");
            if (checkCapture(x + 1, y))
                board[x][y] = 0;
        } else if (board[x + 1][y] == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }

        if ((board[x - 1][y] != move) && (board[x - 1][y] != 0)) //left
        {
            System.out.println("enemy is left");
            if (checkCapture(x - 1, y))
                board[x][y] = 0;
        } else if (board[x - 1][y] == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

My int x is my column and my int y is my row, move is my variable that holds whose turn it is( 1 = black , 2 = white) board is my 2d array that holds the position of all the stones on the board.

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closed as too localized by Oliver Charlesworth, Jim Lewis, Achrome, Soner Gönül, gcbenison Jun 12 '13 at 6:00

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2  
What is your question? –  Code-Apprentice Jun 11 '13 at 23:49
    
@Code-Guru I need help identifying the problem in my code. As I said above its not working correctly. –  user2457344 Jun 11 '13 at 23:52
1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Asking people to spot errors in your code is not especially productive. You should use the debugger (or add print statements) to isolate the problem, by tracing the progress of your program, and comparing it to what you expect to happen. As soon as the two diverge, then you've found your problem. (And then if necessary, you should construct a minimal test-case.) –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 11 '13 at 23:53
1  
A couple of comments: to identify what your question is you need to identify what you're feeding into your program, and what you're getting out... and why that is wrong. Also, why the extra scope braces? And what is move? Because that probably doesn't compile. –  Nathaniel Ford Jun 11 '13 at 23:53
    
Opps I didn't see that extra brace but that doesn't affect the program it still compiles and the method runs fine. and move as a mentioned above "move is my variable that holds whose turn it is( 1 = black , 2 = white)" –  user2457344 Jun 12 '13 at 0:16

4 Answers 4

I think that recursion complicates this solution more than necessary. If I were to implement something like this, I would take the following steps:

  1. Find connected groups of stones. You can limit this to just dragons if you can detect if a group is alive because it has two eyes.

  2. For each group of connected stones, count the liberties vertically and horizontally. (Liberties are unoccupied locations adjacent to a connected group of stones.) If the number of liberties is 0, then the group is captured.

If you are checking for a capture after a move has been made, then you really only need to check the connected groups which are adjacent to the most recent move, not all connected groups.

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1  
For 1, look for flood fill/blob extraction algorithms. –  Patashu Jun 11 '13 at 23:58
    
@Patashu hmm...that's very interesting...detecting captures in Go is similar to filling a polygon on a raster display. I hadn't thought of that, but now that you mention it, it seems like a very good way to approach the problem. –  Code-Apprentice Jun 12 '13 at 0:05
    
@Patashu What is the fill/blob extraction algorithms? Some pseudo code showing how I would implement it would be helpful. –  user2457344 Jun 12 '13 at 0:19
    
@user2457344 I think he is suggesting that you do your own research. You might start with google. Oh, and the two algorithms are "flood fill" and "blob". –  Code-Apprentice Jun 12 '13 at 0:21

First, start out by being explicit about what your function does.

/**
 *  Checks to see if the grid point passed in is captured.
 *  @param...(you should say what your params are here
 **/
public static boolean checkCapture(int x, int y) {
   //some code
}

This is important: what if this function checks to see if the gird point is capturing some other, arbitrary point? Further, we immediately see a problem... captured by who? Whenever solving a recursive problem you need to understand the base case: here it is that there is no vertical or horizontal adjacent area that isn't occupied by an enemy.

Therefore, we must check to see in regards to a particular color:

/**
 *  Checks to see if the grid point passed in is captured.
 *  @param...(you should say what your params are here
 **/
public static boolean checkCapture(int x, int y) {
   if (!isOccupied(x,y)) {//writing this function should be trivial
     return false;//can't be captured; no one is there!
   }

   Color color = getColor(x,y);//similarly, get the color of whoever is there.
   Status status = checkFlanked(x, y, color);
   if (status = Status.FLANKED) {
     return true;
   }
}

private static Status checkFlanked(int x, int y, Color color) {
   //check to see that this location is valid for the board
   //check to see if this square is occupied at all
     //if it is not, return LIBERTY (an empty space means no capture, right?)
     //if it is, is it occupied by the opposite color? --> Return a FLANKED result!
     //if it is, is it occupied by the same color? --> recurse!
}

Now we've broken down our problem a bit! And it's easy to see how the base case is resolved: if the square is unoccupied, it can't be flanking... so it returns a LIBERTY result. If it's occupied by the opposite color, then this square is flanking whomever you were originally checking. The only difficult part is then checking to see whether, in the case of this being occupied by the original color, any other locations have liberty or not.

 //get all valid adjacent locations
 //call checkFlanked on those locations.
 //If any return LIBERTY, return LIBERTY. Otherwise return FLANKED.

(Note: I'm assuming LIBERTY and FLANKED have been defined as an enum for clarity's sake.)

I hope this helps you break down your problem in a more sensible way. Remember: when you're using recursion, you care about two cases: the base case, and the '+1 iteration' case. Note that even with the above you have to solve some problems:

  • You need to intelligently not recurse back to squares you've already visited. (Investigate tail recursion, but you can also just pass in additional state indicating squares that are checked already.)
  • You need to make sure you don't fall off the board and return an appropriate result if you do. Basically, you need to solve the 'what is a valid location?' problem.

Some other interesting questions to ask are:

  • Do you search by-breadth or by-depth?
  • Is this appropriate as a static method, or should it be captured in a class?
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1  
+1 Very good explanation of breaking down a problem into smaller problems. –  Code-Apprentice Jun 12 '13 at 0:26

I have some code that lets you play and capture stones. See this answer: http://gamedev.stackexchange.com/questions/23291/go-game-placing-stones-on-grid-intersections/23406#23406

The trick is to keep track of contiguous blocks of stones and then check after every move to see if that move captures a block.

There is also ko to worry about.

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The problem with recursion in this case is it is very easy to fall into an infinite loop. Checking two stones, checking the right stone will check the left stone will check the right again etc. You need to keep track of the stones you have already checked. You are going to need to pass some state of the stones that you have already checked.

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This is not really a solution; just a potential problem with using recursion. –  Nathaniel Ford Jun 12 '13 at 0:18

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