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I'm reading a text file which has time(hours and minutes) and IP addresses. Then I want to get the time differences and do some activity for every 5 minutes. Following code does not calculate the time difference.

sample text file:

06:03 65.55.215.62
06:04 157.56.92.152
06:04 66.249.74.175
06:05 173.199.116.171

code:

time_ip = []
for line in open('minutes'):
    time_ip.append(line.split(' '))    

df = pandas.DataFrame(time_ip)
df['tvalue'] = df[0]
df['delta'] = (df['tvalue']-df['tvalue'])
share|improve this question
    
df['tvalue']-df['tvalue'] == 0, if df[0] is a number. –  Elazar Jun 12 '13 at 6:26
    
pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/dev/timeseries.html#time-deltas this has some instructions –  Nilani Algiriyage Jun 12 '13 at 6:27
    
@Elazar IT gives the same error...TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for -: 'str' and 'str' –  Nilani Algiriyage Jun 12 '13 at 6:28
    
That's because you read an str from the file. maybe you want t, ip = line.split(' '); t = int(t); time_ip.append([t, ip]); –  Elazar Jun 12 '13 at 6:33
    
This is actually incredibly tricky to do without the date part, as well as ambiguous. –  Andy Hayden Jun 12 '13 at 7:54

3 Answers 3

>>> import datetime
>>> end = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> start = datetime.datetime.now()
>>> diff
datetime.timedelta(0, 7, 424199)
>>> diff = start - end
>>> divmod(diff.days * 86400 + diff.seconds, 60)
(0, 7) # 0 minutes, 7 seconds
share|improve this answer

You should use read_csv to read a csv into a DataFrame:

In [1]: df = pd.read_csv(file_name, sep='\s+', header=None, names=['time', 'ip'])

In [2]: df
Out[2]:
    time               ip
0  06:03     65.55.215.62
1  06:04    157.56.92.152
2  06:04    66.249.74.175
3  06:05  173.199.116.171

Pandas doesn't (yet) have any built in time object, and doing this in python isn't the easy... you can make the time column of time objects:

In [3]: df['time'] = df['time'].apply(lambda x: datetime.time(*map(int, x.split(':'))))

In [4]: df
Out[4]:
       time               ip
0  06:03:00     65.55.215.62
1  06:04:00    157.56.92.152
2  06:04:00    66.249.74.175
3  06:05:00  173.199.116.171

Not least because you can't do arithmetic on datetime.time objects. At any rate, I think you're going to get into a sticky situation by not having the year/month/day here too, for one thing, how to deal with the midnight?

So let's start again, assuming you had a datetime...

In [5]: df = pd.read_csv(file_name, sep='\s+', header=None, names=['time', 'ip'])

In [6]: df['time'] = pd.to_datetime(df['time'])  # let's use todays

In [7]: df
Out[7]:
                 time               ip
0 2013-06-12 06:03:00     65.55.215.62
1 2013-06-12 06:04:00    157.56.92.152
2 2013-06-12 06:04:00    66.249.74.175
3 2013-06-12 06:05:00  173.199.116.171

Then you can grab out the difference using a shift:

In [8]: df['time'].shift()
Out[8]:
0                   NaT
1   2013-06-12 06:03:00
2   2013-06-12 06:04:00
3   2013-06-12 06:04:00
Name: time, dtype: datetime64[ns]

In [9]: d['time'] - df['time'].shift()
Out[9]:
0        NaT
1   00:01:00
2   00:00:00
3   00:01:00
Name: time, dtype: timedelta64[ns]

Much easier. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Why this error?AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'to_datetime' @Andy Hayden –  Nilani Algiriyage Jun 12 '13 at 8:08
    
@NilaniAlgiriyage which version of pandas are you using? You need to upgrade to the latest stable version. :) –  Andy Hayden Jun 12 '13 at 8:09
    
df['time'].shift() produces the same output with IPs? @Andy Hayden –  Nilani Algiriyage Jun 12 '13 at 8:46
    
I don't follow you, the exact output is seen above... ? –  Andy Hayden Jun 12 '13 at 8:56
    
IP column is still there?After performing shift() –  Nilani Algiriyage Jun 12 '13 at 9:10

You can use the datetime module

import datetime
with open('minutes', 'r') as myfile:
    times = myfile.read().split()[::2]
dates = [datetime.datetime.strptime(i, '%H:%M') for i in times]
differences = [j-i for i, j in zip(dates[:-1], dates[1:])]
print [divmod(i.seconds, 60)[0] for i in differences]

Prints:

[1, 0, 1]
share|improve this answer
    
for line in open('minutes'): times = line.split()[::2] dates = [datetime.datetime.strptime(i, '%H:%M')for i in times] differences = [j-i for i, j in zip(dates[:-1], dates[1:])] print [divmod(i.seconds, 60) for i in differences]............this just print an emty array @Haidro –  Nilani Algiriyage Jun 12 '13 at 6:49
    
@NilaniAlgiriyage Updating –  Haidro Jun 12 '13 at 6:49
    
For the simple file this is fine, but for the large data file the output is so confused, how to print this line by line? –  Nilani Algiriyage Jun 12 '13 at 7:04
    
@NilaniAlgiriyage I'll explain the output. The first item in the tuple is the amount of minutes of difference. The second one is the amount of second, if there was a remainder (i.e, if there were 61 seconds) –  Haidro Jun 12 '13 at 7:07
    
@NilaniAlgiriyage I've changed the output so now it just returns the minute difference –  Haidro Jun 12 '13 at 7:09

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