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mongo db 1.4.1

2 collections, identical data, but use different data type (foo - string, bar - number) for field "x":

> db.foo.ensureIndex({x:1});
> db.bar.ensureIndex({x:1});
> db.foo.stats();
{
    "ns" : "impressions.foo",
    "count" : 50000,
    "size" : 23519184,
    "avgObjSize" : 470.38368,
    "storageSize" : 37797888,
    "numExtents" : 8,
    "nindexes" : 2,
    "lastExtentSize" : 15290368,
    "paddingFactor" : 1,
    "systemFlags" : 0,
    "userFlags" : 0,
    "totalIndexSize" : 2526384,
    "indexSizes" : {
        "_id_" : 1463504,
        "x_1" : 1062880
    },
    "ok" : 1
}
> db.bar.stats()
{
    "ns" : "impressions.bar",
    "count" : 50000,
    "size" : 21594256,
    "avgObjSize" : 431.88512,
    "storageSize" : 22507520,
    "numExtents" : 7,
    "nindexes" : 2,
    "lastExtentSize" : 11325440,
    "paddingFactor" : 1,
    "systemFlags" : 0,
    "userFlags" : 0,
    "totalIndexSize" : 2730784,
    "indexSizes" : {
        "_id_" : 1463504,
        "x_1" : 1267280
    },
    "ok" : 1
}

x_1 is bigger in case 2, whereas you would expect the opposite?

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Why would you expect the opposite? –  Dek Dekku Jun 12 '13 at 7:19
    
I have got to admit that is kind of confusing, I mean the average object size is smaller, in fact all stats are smaller for numbner except size, in fact size does not relate very well to the rest of the data in the stats output. @DekDekku probably because it takes less bytes to represent numbers than it does strings –  Sammaye Jun 12 '13 at 7:46
    
It can take less bytes to represent a string if the string is small (and it wouldn't surprise me if all the strings in the collection are "foo" and "bar") while numbers always take the same amount of space. But I can't check the actual data, so... –  Dek Dekku Jun 12 '13 at 7:52
    
@DekDekku "x" is actually a number [0;1000]; foo collection has all fields as strings, whereas bar has all of them as numbers; so the case is indexing "1" vs 1 that's where all the "space" comes from; but i was expecting the index to be smaller as well since it takes less bytes to write a number than a string (given mongo uses UTF8) –  Grigorash Vasilij Jun 12 '13 at 8:42
    
I think representing numbers in UTF-8 gives the same representation as ASCII, 1 byte per character, but I might be wrong. While all integer numbers use 4 bytes. –  Dek Dekku Jun 12 '13 at 8:54
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1 Answer 1

The int value ( or long ) in indexes are stored as double in mongodb, which I guess is 8 bytes. So this might be the cause of larger index size as compared to the string value.

Check the source code. https://github.com/mongodb/mongo/blob/v2.2/src/mongo/db/key.cpp#L312

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